War of the Rebellion: Serial 109 Page 0821 Chapter LXIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - CONFEDERATE.

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JOINT RESOLUTION of thanks to the officers and men of McClung's battery.

Resolved by the Congress of the Confederate States of America, That the thanks of Congress and of the country are due, and are hereby tendered, to the members of McClung's battery for the chivalrous and patriotic manner in which they have revolunteered and tendered their

services for the war, and that a copy of this resolution be transmitted to them without delay.

Approved February 13, 1864.

[33.]

JOINT RESOLUTION of thanks to Major General J. E. B. Stuart and the officers and men under his command.

Resolved by the Congress of the Confederate States of America, That the thanks of Congress are due, and are hereby cordially tendered, to Major General J. E. B. Stuart and to the officers and men under his command for their distinguished gallantry and skill during the present war, especially as displayed in the summer of 1862, in the raid around the army of McClellan across the Chickahominy, the expedition into Pennsylvania, and to Catlett's Station, and in the battles of Fleetwood, Chancellorsville, and other places. That the President be requested to communicate this resolution to General Stuart and the officers and men under his command.

Approved February 17, 1864.

[11, 12, 19, 25.]

RICHMOND, February 16, 1864.

Honorable JAMES A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War:

SIR: I beg to suggest the propriety of suspending the execution of the conscript law within the limits of the county of Bertie, N. C. This county lies between the Chowan and Roanoke Rivers, and, being almost defenseless, is exposed to hostile visits from the enemy's gun-boats. The enemy hold a strong position at Plymout, near the mouth of the Roanoke, and recently have made destructive raids into that county, not alone destroying much private property, but large supplies of provisions which had been accumulated by agents of the State and Confederate Governments for the use of their respective forces. It is impracticable to enforce the conscript law in that county fully, and when at attempt has been made it has resulted in securing but few men for the service, while many have escaped to places beyond the reach of our authority; some have joined the enemy, and returned only to ravage and plunder. The condition of things there existing, from the causes stated, and in the absence of an adequate protecting force of our own, has become a perilous and painful one. I respectfully submit whether, if the power to suspend exists, as under the circumstances I understand it does, sound policy, as well as a proper regard to the true and faithful people of that county, do not require it to be done.

Most respectfully, &c.,

W. N. H. SMITH.

[First indorsement.]

FEBRUARY 18, 1864.

Respectfully submitted to the consideration of the President.

J. A. S.,

Secretary.