War of the Rebellion: Serial 109 Page 0778 MD., E. N. C., PA., VA., EXCEPT S. W., & W. VA. Chapter LXIII.

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verbally or otherwise, to me for this great insult to the authority and laws of a sovereign State, which I thought and still think he might and should have done. Of course I accept his denial of any knowledge of the transaction as true. As to Lieutenant-Colonel Shepherd (whom the men in the darkness called "major") I suppose I must have fallen into a very great mistake concerning him. If he is the officer upon whom I called at the hotel, and who went with me to the scene of violence, then I owe him a great many thanks for his assistance instead of an accusation of guilt. Somewhow I got it into my head that the officer who assisted me was a Lieutenant-Colonel Harris, and upon arriving at the Standard office I heard soldiers calling for Major Shepherd, but did not know it was the officer with me. The mistake was a very natural one, owing to the confusion and darkness, and I regret that I did Lieutenant-Colonel Shepherd injustice. His was the only name I heard called, and I did not ask any man for his name. There were several company officers in the crowd, as I judged by their swords and by hearing men call out frequently "captain," "lieutenant," &c. This, as you will see, was the substance of my complaint to the President. I wished no punishment inflicted upon the private soldiers, but if they really were led on or encouraged by officers it would be highly proper and politic that they should be punished.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

Z. B. VANCE.

Please send copies of General B[enning] and Lieutenant-colonel S[hepherd].

[29.]

BUCKLAND, October 19, 1863-10 a. m.

[General R. E. LEE:?]

GENERAL: The enemy have advanced slowly this morning from Gainesville and are now opposite me at this place. My position is such that I think it will be necessary for them to cross either above or below me. I expect to remain here until they do one or the other, unless their movements in front of Major General Fitz. Lee, from whim I have not heard this morning, make it necessary for me to move sooner. I would be glad if you will let me know where you can be found after to-day.

Most respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. E. B. STUART,

Major-General.

I ascertained last night that Kilpatrick's left Sudley yesterday afternoon with 2,500 cavalry and four pieces of artillery, declaring his intention to go to Warrenton and sending back everything pertaining to his command except the force with him. The impression with the soldiers seems to be that the army will not fight this side of the fortification at Alexandria. Our skirmishers are now engaged across Broad Run, slightly.

Most respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. E. B. S.,

Major-General.

[29.]

NEW BALTIMORE, October 20, 1863-10.30 a. m.

[General R. E. LEE:?]

GENERAL: There is a force of infantry advancing from Buckland on my rear. Major Mosby reported to me that a column of infantry was