War of the Rebellion: Serial 109 Page 0774 MD., E. N. C., PA., VA., EXCEPT S. W., & W. VA. Chapter LXIII.

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under the greatest disadvantages, both in the inferiority of our cavalry in numbers to that of the enemy and also the indifference of our arms and equipments. It does appear, under the circumstances, that all the efficient cavalry in our service which is not actually required for the defense of other points should at once be brought to our help. I most respectfully ask that, if the above-named regiments cannot be ordered to this corps, that others may be ordered from the same department. I am informed by good authority that there is over 6,000 cavalry on the coast of Georgia and South Carolina, and I pray, for the good of the service, that a portion of this spendid cavalry may be ordered to strengthen us in order that we may meet the enemy upon a more equal footing.

I have the honor, very respectfully, to be, your obedient servant,

P. M. B. YOUNG,

Colonel, Commanding Butler's Cavalry Brigade.

[29.]

[First indorsement.]

HDQRS. CAV. CORPS, ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA,

October 24, 1863.

Respectfully forwarded approved.

More cavalry should be sent to this army. Here is massed the largest force of the enemy's cavalry, and the best. My force has always been inadequate in numbers to the work to be performed. I hope local attachments will be overruled and the cavalry ordered to this army.

J. E. B. STUART,

Major-General.

[Second indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA,

October 26, 1863.

Respectfully forwarded and recommended.

I hope these regiments can be spared for service with this army, where their service are much needed.

R. E. LEE,

General.

[Third indorsement.] ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR GENERAL'S OFFICE, November 2, 1863.

Respectfully referred to General Beauregard.

By command of Secretary of War:

H. L. CLAY,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Fourth indorsement.]

HDQRS. DEPT. OF S. CAROLINA, Georgia, AND FLORIDA,

Charleston, November 6, 1863.

Respectfully returned.

The "good authority" referred to by Colonel P. M. B. Young is saying "there is over 6,000 cavalry on the coast of Georgia and South Carolina" was mistaken, for there are only 4,941 to guard the whole coast from the North Carolina line to Florida, a distance of 350 miles, including the town of Georgetown, the important cities of Charleston and Savannah, and the indispensable railroad communications of those two cities with each other and the interior of the State. The destruction of those railroads would leave both cities without resources, which would necessarily cause their evacuation. It is proper to remark,