War of the Rebellion: Serial 109 Page 0758 MD., E. N. C., PA., VA., EXCEPT S. W., & W. VA. Chapter LXIII.

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FREDERICKSBURG, August 22, 1863.

General R. E. LEE:

Scouts just in report that the Twelfth Army Corps left Sunday for Alexandria. They also confirm the report of the number deserting from the enemy.

FITZ. LEE,

Brigadier-General.

[29.]

ORDNANCE OFFICE, ARTILLERY FIRST CORPS,

ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA,

August 22, 1863.

Colonel J. B. WALTON,

Chief of Artillery, First Army Corps:

COLONEL: I have the honor to make the following report of the disposition of the guns that were "turned over, sent to the rear, and ordered to be abandoned" after the battle of Gettysburg. In the communication of Lieutenant Colonel G. M. Sorrel to yourself, dated July 19, which was referred to me for a report of the disposition of the guns, the guns "turned over, sent to the rear, and ordered to be abandoned" embrace the following: First, a Napoleon gun of the Washington Artillery, sent to the rear; second, a 12-pounder howitzer of Dearing's battalion, sent to the rear; third, a 12-pounder howitzer of Alexander's battalion, sent to the rear; fourth, a 12-pounder howitzer of Washington Artillery, sent to the rear; fifth, a 12-pounder howitzer of Henry's battalion, injured, and turned over; sixth, a 3-inch rifle (manufactured at Rome, Ga.) of Cabell's battalion, turned over; seventh, a 12-pounder howitzer of Alexander's battalion, injured, and ordered to be abandoned; eight, a 3-inch rifle (Richmond make) Henry's battalion, burst at Gettysburg. In obedience to orders from you to ascertain, if practicable, the present position of these guns, I telegraphed on August 4 to Major B. Randolph, ordnance officer at Staunton, Va., inquiring if these guns were at that depot. I at the same time wrote to Major Randolph, inquiring at some length about the guns and asking for the distinguishing marks of the guns received at Staunton since the battle of Gettysburg to enable me to identify those belonging to this corps. I received shortly afterward a telegram from Lieutenant Cosby, assistant ordnance officer at that post, which was altogether unsatisfactory in the information it gave, and a few days later a letter, dated August 7, accompanying a list of all the guns at Staunton. From this I could only gain the number and character of the guns at that place. I sent you a communication, dated the 9th instant, giving the result of my inquiries, and received yours in reply, dated the 10th, with instructions to make further inquiries about the guns and ascertain if possible what had become of them after they passed out of the hands of this corps. I wrote to Lieutenant Cosby August 10, asking him to send me a list of the marks on all the Napoleons, Rome rifles, and 12-pounder brass howitzers at Staunton. His reply, dated the 17th, put me in possession of the following facts: First, that the "injured Napoleon of the Washington Artillery" was in Staunton, Va.; second, that the 12-pounder howitzer of Alexander's battalion, "sent to the rear," was in Staunton; third, that the 12-pounder howitzer of the Washington Artillery, "sent to the rear," was in Staunton; fourth, that the 12-pounder howitzer of Henry's battalion, "injured and turned over," was in Staunton; fifth, that the 12-pounder howitzer of Alexander's battalion, "injured and ordered to be abandoned," was in Staunton. In