War of the Rebellion: Serial 109 Page 0670 SW. VA., KY., TENN., MISS., ALA., W. FLA., &. N. GA. Chapter LXIV.

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HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DISTRICT OF Kentucky,

Lexington, Ky., January 3, 1865.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.:

I desire to visit Washington to see you on important business relative to the condition of affairs in Kentucky. I have never been in Washington.

S. G. BURBRIDGE,

Brevet Major-General, Commanding.

[45.]

HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DISTRICT OF Kentucky,

Lexington, Ky., January 4, 1865.

Brevet Major-General BURBRIDGE,

Frankfort, Ky.:

The Secretary says he will be very glad to see you at Washington.

DICKSON.

[45.]

HDQRS. SECOND Brigadier, THIRD DIV., FIFTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Savannah, Ga., January 6, 1865.

Major General WILLIAM T. SHERMAN,

Commanding the Mil. Div. of the Mississippi, Savannah, Ga.:

GENERAL: You no doubt remember our conversation at Cartersville, Ga., in September last, in reference to your report of the battle of Mission Ridge, and the part my command took in that battle. Acting upon your suggestion, I address you this note for the purpose of putting upon paper the statements I then made to you. I was ordered to support General Matthies, whose brigade was closely engaged with the enemy near the crest of the hill to the left of the tunnel. I went forward at the double-quick, int wo lines, under a sharp artillery fire. I formed the Seventeenth Iowa and Eightieth Ohio Volunteers behind the fence, on the upper side of the field, and the Fifty-sixth Illinois and Tenth Missouri Volunteers in the road at the foot of the hill. A short time after these dispositions were made I received information that General

Matthies' brigade was running short of ammunition. I at once ordered the Seventeenth Iowa and Eightieth Ohio forward, inteding to relieve the troops in front. At this juncture the enemy, massing a considerable force upon the right flank of Matthies' brigade, made a furious attack upon him. I was with my advance troops, and therefore could not see what was going on aroundthe point of the hill. My men had not advanced more than forty yards beyond the fence when I discovered that Matthies' right had been forced back, carrying mine with it, and that the enemy had actually passed to our rear on the right, while they were making a vigorous attack in front. The disorder on the right communicated rapidly, and in a few moments the entire line gave way, and was reformed againa s indicated in your report. The enemy pursued and formed an irregular line below the upper fence. My second line, composed of the fifty-sixth Illinois and Tenth Missouri Volunteers, stood firm, engaged the enemy with spirit, and forced him to retire to his works upon the hill. It was whilst directing the fire of these two regiments that I was wounded. I did not leave the field, however, until the engagement was over, so that what I have stated is from my personal knowledge. When I read your report I supposed