War of the Rebellion: Serial 109 Page 0494 SW. VA., KY., TENN., MISS., ALA., W. FLA., & N. GA. Chapter LXIV.

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about 700, my numbers are reduced to about 5,800. The depletion of this corps has been by actual service and by the detachment of the First Division to Charleston. I feel constrained again to ask that it be placed on the same footing as to numbers as the other corps of the army. The part it will play in building roads, making intrenchments, or in battle will be that of a corps. At the least, I urge the necessity while stationed here of replacing the One hundred and first and Eightieth by regiments of equal strength.

Very respectfully,

O. O. HOWARD,

[31.] Major-General, Commanding.

SPECIAL FIELD ORDERS,

HDQRS. MIL. DIV. OF THE MISS.,

Numbers 11.

Chattanooga, Tenn., November 14, 1863.

Colonel J. C. McKibbin, additinal aide-de-camp, having reported to the major-general commanding, in pursuance of Special Orders, Numbers 486, Adjutant-General's Office, current service, is hereby assigned to duty with Major General George H. Thomas, commanding Department of the Cumberland, and will report accordingly.

By order of Major General U. S. Grant:

GEO. K. LEET,

[31.] Assistant-Adjutant-General.

KNOXVILLE, November 17, 1863.

General WILLCOX:

The enemy is advancing upon us, and telegraph communication may be cut. Should it be, and your receive no further instructions from these headquarters you will be governed by your previous instructions and your own judgment. A train loead of provisions have been unloaded at Cumberland Gap.

John G. PARKE,

[31.] Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS NINTH ARMY CORPS,

Knoxville, Tenn., November 19, 1863.

Colonel HARTRANFT:

You will prepare all the buildings that you may deem likely to interfere with the defense of your line for being fired at once on being obliged to abandon them. You will prepare the brick building at the railroad depot and the mill for defense by loophing them, &c. Your skirmishers must be instructed if driven in to throw themselves into these buildings and to hold them to the last extermity, and them, if possible, they should be fired. These buildings are quite as valuable to us for puspose of defense as to the enemy for cover or attack, and if in the enemy's hands they would be fromidable to us in our works, they will certainly be more fromidable if held by us against an enemy advancing without cover, and if gallantly held can hardly be taken or be very likely to be assaulted. You will also raze all buildings that may interfere with the security of your line that you may think necessary. Details of trusty men should be made for firing the buildings at the proper time.

By command of Brigadier-General Potter:

SAML. WRIGHT,

[31.] Assistant Adjutant-General.