War of the Rebellion: Serial 109 Page 0473 Chapter LXIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS ELEVENTH CORPS,

October 14, 1863.

Major General JOSEPH HOOKER:

A citizen from near Gordon's Mills brings a report that he deems reliable that the rebels intend to take the offensive this week, attempting a crossing at two points, at this place and at Chattanooga. They have plenty of force and are prefectly confident of success. They have selected a point on Raccoon Range, commanding this place, for their guns, moving also their infantry down the sides of the mountain. Thus far there is no infantry this side of Lookout Mountain. Rebel soldiers and officers daily visit his house and say they have great difficulty in getting rations. He thinks this movement will be delayed by the rain causing such a rise in the river. This man is an educated Northern man, resident here. He had his information from an English lady, who came some distnce to tell him that the above is the common report amongst the leading secessionists in this section.

O. O. HOWARD,

[30.] Major-General.

SPECIAL FIELD ORDERS,

HDQRS. ARMY OF THE OHIO, Numbers 50.

October 16, 1863.

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4. The commanding officer of the First North Carolina Mounted Infantry will proceed with his command to Greenville, East Tenn., by the first train. The quatermaster's department will furnish the necessary transportation.

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13. Colonel William Dugan is hereby authorized to raise a regiment of infantry in Sevier County, East Tenn., to be called the Mountain Rangers, to serve for three years, or during the war. The regiment to be organized in accordance with General Orders, Numbers 110, current series, from the War Department.

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By command of Major-General Burnsdie:

EDWARD M. NEILL,

[30.] Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ELEVENTH CORPS,

Bridgeport, Ala., October 17, 1863.

Major-General BUTTERFIELD,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: I wish to call the attention of the commanding general to the fact that a sudde emergency required the sending of troops to Charleston in August last. My First Division was chosen because its numbers answered to those needed. It was never been returned or replaced. My command has a crops reputation to sustain with less numbers by far than any others. I make no complaint, but ask to be placed on an equal footing with other generals in command of corps. My aggregate for duty now is about 6,000.

Very respectfully,

O. O. HOWARD,

[30.] Major-General, Commanding.