War of the Rebellion: Serial 109 Page 0398 SW. VA., KY., TENN., MISS., ALA., W. FLA., & N. GA. Chapter LXIV.

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operating successfuly against guerrillas, and deem it best that no official report be rendered, as I did not require any from the command sent after them. They captured 12 horses, 3 mules, and equipments, and about 1,000 pounds of bacon in a cave in the mountains. The men are reported to have escaped.

I am, general, respectfully,

A. McD. McCOOK,

Major-General, Commanding.

[23.]

INDIANAPOLIS, July 10, 1863.

(Received 11.40 a. m.)

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

Morgan is in Indiana with 5,100 cavalry and six pieces of artillery. Please order General Wallace, now at Crawfordsville, to report to me at once. I have no officers, and need his services badly. Answer.

O. P. MORTON,

Governor of Indiana.

[23.]

INDIANAPOLIS, July 10, 1863.

General LEW. WALLACE:

Have telegraphed Halleck to allow you to assist Governor Morton, but come at once. He needs you badly, and he will stand between you and harm. Morgan has between 4,000 and 8,000 and we have no officers. Says he is coming here, and is supposed to be moving in direction of Seymour. Answer.

W. R. HOLLOWAY.

[23.]

WINCHESTER, July 10, 1863.

General SHERIDAN:

GENERAL: The following is an extract from a communication just received from the general commanding:

The general commanding will not give specific directions in regard to Sheridan's route, but, in view of the uncertainty in reference to the enemy's position, and of the bad state of the road, will leave much to his discretion; he desires, however, and also that a sufficient force be sent along the railroad to keep off bridge burners until the road can be fully occupied; be sent the railroad to keep off bridge burners until the road can be fully occupied; he desires, also, to obtain all possible information of the enemy's position and intentions.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. P. THRUSTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General and Chief of Staff.

[23.]

MEMPHIS, July 10, 1863.

A. LINCOLN,

President of the United States:

I take the liberty of writing this unofficial letter by Mr. Dana, now on his way to Washington, that you may more fully understand the reasons of my resignation, which will soon reach you. I believe the war as war is practically over. I think most of the seceded States will, as States, offer to return. I think North Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia will consent to gradual emancipation, and probably Louisiana.