War of the Rebellion: Serial 109 Page 0388 SW., VA., KY., TENN., MISS., ALA., W. FLA., & N. GA. Chapter LXIV.

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Elk. The water in my road took the wagon beds, but we do not consider that an obstruction in this corps. I have not heard from Sheridan since his arrival at Cowan. He has not fired a shot. I am expecting news from him every moment of importance; it will be forwarded. Cleburne's division, with a considerable wagon train, passed here yesterday. Prominent rebels say here they intend to fight at Bridgeport. I will hold myself here until I know the wishes of the general commanding. I sent 250 bushels of corn to the mill and will soon have plenty of meal. I have captured some salt and cows: chickens, vegetables, plenty; hay, wheat and corn in small quantities for animals. I am pretty well off. Sheridan is rationed to the 12th instant. Stearns was buried here yesterday.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. McD. McCOOK,

Major-General, Commanding.

[23.]

WINCHESTER, July 3, 1863-4 p. m.

General SHERIDAN:

General McCook directs me to say to you that the general commanding the department is much delighted with the manner in which you conducted the advance yesterday and to-day. One thousand cavalry, under Colonel Watkins, were ordered to report to you this morning. If you can make them useful, push them forward. Do what you wish with them. The general does not think you will gain any advantage by taking your command up into the mountains. Corps headquarters will be at Winchester to-night.*

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. P. THRUSTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General and Chief of Staff.

[23.]

HEADQUARTERS TWENTY-FIRST ARMY CORPS,

Hillsborough, July 3, 1863-9.30 a. m.

Brigadier-General GARFIELD,

Chief of Staff, Department of the Cumberland:

SIR: I wrote you on my return here at 9 p. m. yesterday,+ and this morning at 6.30 received your dispatch of 1.30 a m. ++ ordering me to proceed again to Pelham with Wood's division. I am resting the men, and in half an hour, if I do not receive other instructions from you, shall march back to Pelham. I delay this march not only for the men's sake, who have marched three hours already, but in the hope of receiving further advices from you in reply to my two dispatches of yesterday, dated 7 a. m. and 9 p. m., respectively. My men's rations, especially bread, are all but exhausted, much having been destroyed in bread the men will soon sicken. I have heard nothing from General Palmer since yesterday morning, but have sent scouts out in the hope of opening communication with him.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. L. CRITTENDEN,

Major-General, Commanding.

[23.]

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* See Sheridan's report, VOL. XXII, Part I, p. 513.

+ See p. 386.

+ See VOL. XXIII, Part II, p. 508.

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