War of the Rebellion: Serial 109 Page 0374 SW., VA., KY., TENN., MISS., ALA., W. FLA., & N. GA. Chapter LXIV.

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HEADQUARTERS TWENTY-FIRST ARMY CORPS,

Hollow Springs, Tenn., June 26, 1863-4.15 p. m.

Brigadier General J. A. GARFIELD,

Chief of Staff, Department of the Cumberland:

SIR: I wrote you at 7.27 and 9.30 a. m. this day, and have ever since been anxiously looking for dispatch from yu, as I am unawaare whether you received my dispatch of yesterday reporting my arrival here. The heavy and incessant rains still continue, and at 3.30 p. m. General Palmer had but the wagons of his first brigade up the hill, and in addition to the wagons of the two other brigades there are the wagons of the cavalry, reported to be 200 in number, ahead of General Wood. So long as this weather continues, it is impossible for me to form any opinion as to when my command will arrive here. General Turchin sends me word from Lumley's Stand, 12.15 p. m., that he has just return4ed from a reconnaissance four miles to the front on Manchester road. There are no vedettes of the enemy and I can hear of no force at Manchester. Captan Thompson, of the Fourth Cavavlry, has gone to General Thomas with your dispatch. I have strong pickets on all roads. My dispatch to General Thomas was informing him of my present position and difficulties. I am making every effort to get my command here, and shall continue to do so. Every man that can possibly work on the road is there, and with a few hours of sunshine the roads would improve so as to enable me to move some time to-morrow for Manchester, as ordered; at least I hope so.*

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. L. CRITTENDEN,

Major-General, Commanding.

[23.]

HEADQUARTERS TWENTY-FIRST ARMY CORPS,

Hollow Springs, Tenn., June 26, 1863.

Major-General THOMAS,

Commanding Fourteenth Army Corps:

GENERAL: I write to inform you of my present position. I could get no farther than Hollow Springs last night, three miles from Lumley's Stand, where I was ordered to be, owing to the bad condition of the road. This moring I am pulling up General Palmer's wagons by ropes and soldiers, and General Wood's command is in rear of General Palmer's train. General Wood camped last night two miles and a half this side of Bradyville. I look for General Palmer's train to be up by midday, when, unless I get further orders, I shall move General Palmer's command, and General Wood's infantry, less a sufficient guard to protect and bring on his artillery and wagons, with the view of occupying Manchester and the crossing of Duck River to-night as ordered. I have ordered General Turchin forward with his cavalry, with instructions to move cautiously, and if practicable, to open communication with you. He will apprise you fully of my present position. Please let me hear from you. +

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. L. CRITTENDEN,

Major-General, Commanding.

[23.]

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* For reply, see Garfield to Crittenden, 5.15 p. m., VOL. XXIII, Part II, p. 460.

+ For reply, see Thomas to Crittenden, VOL. XXII, Part II, p. 466.

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