War of the Rebellion: Serial 109 Page 0373 Chapter LXIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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Wood is still three miles behind us, and the center train of Palmer's cannot be brought up the hil before 12 o'clock to-day, at which time the head of Wood's column, will arrive here (Hollow Springs). Your order was written, I presume, before the receipt of my dispatch dated 9.45 p. m., and as yet. I have no knowledge that my dispatch of 2.45 p. m. has reached you. This last dispatch would have warned you of the great probability of the impossibility for me to execute your order. You may form some slight idea of the difficulties I have encountered when I inform you that it has been found the most practicable to haul the wagons up the hill by ropes and by soldiers. Unless I get further instructions from you, which I look for momentarily, I shall move my command forward as soon as Wood's troops arrive, leaving a strong guard with the transportation, which will follow as rapidly as possible. I shall endeavor to execute your orders to occupy Manchester and the crossing of Duck River to-night. I will send out the cavalry to proceed cautiosuly, with the view of communicating with General Thomas, and to inform him of my position and prospects.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. L. CRITTENDEN,

Major-General, Commanding.

[23.]

HEADQUARTERS TWENTY-FIRST ARMY CORPS,

Hollow Springs, Tenn., June 26, 1863-9.30 a. m.

Brigadier-General GARFIELD,

Chief of Staff, Department of the Cumberland:

SIR: It has again commenced raining heavily, and Colonel Starling, who has just arrived from my rear, reports that it will be hardly possible for General Wood and his troops to arrive here before night. I have fifty men to a wagon to push and pull up General Palmer's tranportation.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. L. CRITTENDEN,

Major-General, Commanding.

[23.]

HEADQUARTERS TWENTY-FIRST ARMY CORPS,

Hollow Springs, Tenn., June 26, 1863-9.30 a. m.

Brigadier General J. A. GARFIELD,

Chief of Staff, Department of the Cumberland:

SIR: I wrote you at 7.27 a. m. in the expectation of moving my command at 12 m. Since then heavy rains have set in, and Colonel Starling, who has just arrived from the rear, states that it will be hardly possible for Wood and his troops to arrive here before night. I am using every exertion to get the wagons up the hill, putting fifty men to each wagon, and anxiously instructions from you in view of these unexpected obstacles and delays.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. L. CRITTENDEN,

Major-General, Commanding.

[23.]