War of the Rebellion: Serial 109 Page 0370 SW. VA., KY., TENN., MISS., ALA., W. FLA., & N. GA. Chapter LXIV.

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HEADQUARTERS TWENTY-FIRST CORPS,

June 25, 1863-9.30 a. m.

Brigadier General J. A. GARFIELD,

Chief of Staff, Department of the Cumberland:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of your dispatch* this mornin, by an officer of the Fifteen Pennsylvania Cavalry, ordered to establish courier-lines. I am now within one mile of the uplands, which, General Turchin has just reported to me, is in the possession of the cavalry sent to my left. Thus far I have seen or heard of no enemy except that reported in my letter of last night. I am there hours from Hollow Springs, still marching, and intend to reach Lumley's Stand to-night, which is now seven miles from the head of my column. I have abandoned the signal station at Pilot Knob, and have sent the signal corps officers to the front to look out for a good stand to signal to my right if other stations are established. The courier-line is now established between me and Bradyville and will be from my headquarters to-night. The roads are very bad, but I have great faith in getting my entire command up at the ordered to night. General Palmer has just left me. He has no other information. From the best information I can get, I am from eight to ten miles from the line of the Murfreesborough and Manchester pike, and suppose I shall be about the same distance from there at my headquarters to-night.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. L. CRITTENDEN,

Major-General, Commanding.

[23.]

HEADQUARTERS TWENTY-FIRST ARMY CORPS,

Hollow Springs, Tenn., June 25, 1863-2.45 p. m.

Brigadier General J. A. GARFIELD,

Chief of Staff, Department of the Cumberland"

SIR: I have this moment arrived at Hollow Springs, distant from Lumley's Stand three miles. General Palmer's infantry is also up, but the hill is so steep and rought and the roads so bad that I fear it will be impossible to get more than Palmer's artillery and transportation up. Later in the afternoon I shall determine as to encampment of General Wood's troops, but at present I purpose to bring them here. General Turchin has been to Lumley's Stand. He is now here. He reports no water at Lumley's Stand, and the impracticability of getting more than General Wood's troops here to-night has determined me in encamping at this place. Lumley's Stand is now occupied by the cavalry. I sahll withdraw the cavalry with the exception of three squadrons to-night. General Turchin has captured two couriers. They report having sent or carried one dispatch from McMinnville to Beech Grove to-day. They belonged to the Seventh Confederate Cavalry. I wrote you at 9.30 this morning.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. L. CRITTENDEN,

Major-General, Commanding.

[23.]

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* See VOL. XXIII, Part II, p. 455.

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