War of the Rebellion: Serial 109 Page 0233 Chapter LXIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

would have a powerful effect both by inspiring our men and disheartening the enemy. If you will get upon the field, leaving all your baggage on the east bank of the river, it will be a move to our advantage, and possibly save the day to us. The rebel force is estimated at over 100,000 men. My headquarters will be in the log building on top of the hill, where you will be furnished a staff officer to guide you to your place on the field.*

Respectfully, &c.,

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

[10.]

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Numbers 77.

Saint Louis, April 6, 1862.

* * * *

7. Brigadier General I. F. Quinby is assigned to duty under Major-General Grant on the Tennessee River. He will report at General Grant's headquarters.

* * * *

By order of Major-General Halleck:

J. C. KELTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[10.]

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Numbers 80.

Saint Louis, April 7, 1862.

* * * *

10. Captain Bolton's battery Illinois light artillery, now at Benton Barracks, will proceed up the Tennessee River and report to Major General U. S. Grant, commanding District of West Tennessee.* * *

11. Brigadier General G. W. Cullum will proceed to Columbus, KY., and take charge of the fortifications on the Mississippi River.

* * * *

By order of Major-General Halleck:

J. C. KELTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[10.]

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF WEST TENNESSEE,

Pittsburg, April 7, 1862.

Major General D. C. BUELL:

GENERAL: When I left the field this evening my intention was to occupy the most advanced position possible for the night, with the infantry engaged through the day, and follow up our success with cavalry and fresh troops expected to arrive during my last absence on the field. The great fatigue of our men, they having been engaged in two days' fight, or subject to a march yesterday and fight to-day, would preclude the idea of making any advance to-night without the arrival of the expected re-enforcements. My plan therefore will be to feel out in the morning with all the troops on the outer line until our cavalry force can be organized (one regiment of your army will finish crossing soon) and a sufficient artillery and infantry support to follow them are ready for a move. Under the instructions which I have previously, received, and a dispatch also of to-day from Major-General Halleck, it will not

---------------

*From original as received by Buell. For version as recorded in Grant's letters-sent book, see VOL. X, Part II, p. 95.

---------------