War of the Rebellion: Serial 109 Page 0114 SW. VA., KY., TENN., MISS., ALA., W. FLA., &. N. GA. Chapter LXIV.

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JULY 20-25, 1864.-Scout from Pulaski, Tenn., to Florence, Ala.

Report of Lieutenant Colonel George Spalding, Twelfth Tennessee Cavalry, commanding brigade.

HDQRS. SECOND BRIGADE, FOURTH DIV. CAVALRY,

ARMY OF THE CUMBELRAND,

Pulaski, Tenn., July 25, 1864.

I have the honor to submit the following report:

In accordance with orders from the general commanding I left camp with 500 men on the 20th instant at 1 p. m., and camped at Lwerenceburg that night. On the 21st instant I sent thirty men to Florence for the purpose of communicating with the squadron that I had sent out on the 18th instant. I also sent parties to Waynesborough, Henrysville, and up Buffalo Creek and Shoal Creek. One of the parties were fired upon by a party of guerrillas. My men attacked them, killing one. The others made their escape in the woods. One guerrilla that was captured and brought to camp I had shot in Lawrenceburg, and made the citizens bury the body. I then learned that there was a large number of rebels in Florence, and that they had attacked a squadron of my brigade. I marched for Florence, and reached it on the morning of the 23d. The rebels had all crossed the river. I sent some men down to the river to see if we could cross it. It was found unfordable, and I was compelled to allow them to cheer and yell, without being able to reach them. I found it exceedingly difficult to subsist my horses in the country. Sometimes I had to march twenty-four hours without forage.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. SPALDING,

Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding.

Captain CHARLES T. GARDNER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[39.]

JULY 29, 1864.-Scout from Triana to Somerville, Ala.

Report of Major Alfred B. Wade Seventy-third Indiana Infantry.

HEADQUARTERS SEVENTY-THIRD INDIANA INFANTRY,

Triana, Ala., July 30, 1864.

SIR: I have the honor to report that I left Tiana at 3 a. m. yesterday with a force of forty-seven men and one commissioned officer. (Surgeon Myers and Chaplain Frazier also volunteered and accompanied the expedition.) I marched to Atkins' Ferry, and by 5.30 a. m. had transferred the whole force across. Three guns were lost by the capsizing of a canoe, but were subsequently recovered by the men who were left behind for that purpose. I then marched south-southwest, and at 7 a. m. entered Somerville, the country seat of Morgan County, a distance of nine miles. Contrary to expectation, no troops were found here. Not being mounted, the scouts we encountered escaped from us and alarmed the country in advance. Hearing of a force on Flint Creek, I held the town but half an hour, and then retired via thhe Fletcher's Ferry and Decatur roads, a distance oif eleven miles and a half, and by 4.30 p. m. was in camp, having marched twenty miles and a half, crossing the Tennessee River twice, in thirteen hours and a half. Four of my men suffered somewhat from sunstroke, but not