War of the Rebellion: Serial 109 Page 0105 Chapter LXIV. THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN.

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regiments. The only force north of the Coosa, this side of Cedar Bluffs, I could hear of was about 100 or 200 Texas rangers. I found forage and stock very scarce, particularly north of the river. I could learn of no depot of supplies about Center, and found barely enough in the neighborhood to feed my stock once. I brought in 12 prisoners, 9 horses, and 25 mules.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. L. GODFREY,

Lieutenant-Colonel First Alabama Cavalry, Commanding Regiment.

Lieutenant T. W. LETTON,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Post Rome, Ga.

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HEADQUARTERS FIRST ALABAMA CAVALRY,

July 31, 1864.

LIEUTENANT: In compliance with orders from your headquarters, I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by the troops under my immediate command in the late expedition that left Rome the 28th instant for Cedar Bluffs:

I left camp with six squadrons of cavalry, 160 men, and eleven wagons, in company with Major Forsse, oif the Fifty-seventh Illinois, with fifty infantry. When within about six miles of Cedar Bluffs Major Forsse, with his infantry, one squadron of cavalry, and six wagons, took a left-hand road toward the river for the purpose of loading up a mill, with instructions to join me on the Alabama road the next morning. With the other five squadrons I proceeded to Mr. Noble's place, about two miles north of Cedar Bluffs, sending one squadron through the latter place, which destroyed a boat at the ferry. I went into camp at Noble's place, and sent one company across the Chattooga River for forage-which, by the way, is very scarce in that vicinity-where they encoutnered one company of rebel cavalry andput them to flight. In the morning we started after the same company; came up with them, but they scattered ine very direction, so that we were unable to capture them. Of the five wagons I had with me, three were loaded with cotton at Noble's, one with a family of refugees living near by, and one with corn to feed on the road. Three wagons, with two squadrons of cavalry, I sent to join Major Forsee, with instructions for him to take the wagons, with all t he stock he could pick up, to camp. With the three remaining squadrons I started for the bend of the river, where I heard were 100 rebels fortifying. I scoured that portion of the country until night, but found none of the enemy or stock, everything having been driven off. I reached camp at 12 o'clock that night, bringing in 2 prisoners, 2 horses, and 4 mules. The prisoners were turned over to the provost-marshal, the horses and mules to the quartermaster. Of the language used by the Noble girls when I told them-as their brother had reuqested-that I had come to move them in town, one of them remarked that she was not going; that she would sooner stay there and tarve than move into Rome among the Yankees, and a good deal more of the same purport which I disremember.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. L. GODFREY,

Lieutenant-Colonel First Alabama Cavalry.

Lieutenant T. W. LETTON,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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