War of the Rebellion: Serial 109 Page 0014

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Page 14
Chapter LXIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.


<NN>Arsenal, has to-day resigned. We are only waiting a letter from the Governor to occupy the arsenal. Fort Caswell was taken yesterday. Major Holmes says the guns there are not mounted, and it is absolutely necessary that an engineer officer should be there. It occurred to me that if you had such a person to spare he would be heartily welcome to the people of Wilmington. I wrote to the Governor to-day, informing him I would write to you, and suggested that he would telegraph you to the same effect. I have no doubt he will approve of the course I have taken. I awai myself of this opportinity to congratulate yourself and the South upon your election. Permit me to add, I know no other hands in which the honor and interest of the South could have been better confided.

With the heartiest wishes for your welfare, personal and political, I am, very truly and respectfully,

WARREN WINSLOW.

[1.]

MORRIS ISLAND, April 16, 1861-2 p. m.

[Brigadier General G. T. BEAUREGARD:]

MY DEAR GENERAL: I have just examined Sumter apropos of the visit of the North Carolina commissioners. I fing the following facts: We can without detriment let them have three 8-inch columbiad guns and carriages complete, the guns now lying on the parade, the carriages made up form disabled guns on the rampart bearing toward the city; also two 8-inch sea-coast howitzers and carriages. We cannot from the rubbish move any 24-pounders at all for the present. It is better to take the above from Sumter, and these, with the enfilade battery, will supply their wants. I have given derections to Captain Hallonquist, who goes to work immediately. I assure you these guns can be spared without any harm to us. In view of the importance of the matter to the Confederacy and the much greater ease with which they can be supplied from Sumter and Sullivan's Island than from Morris, I suggest the following assignments: To Caswell, two 8-inch columbiads and two sea-coast howitzers from Sumter; to Macon, one 8-inch columbiad and two 32-pounders from the enfilade; to New Inlet, near Caswell, two 24-pounders from the enfulade on Sullivan.

Very respectfully,

WM. H. C. WHITING,
Acting Inspector-General.

[1.]

CHARLESTON, S. C., April 16, 1861.

[Brigadier General G. T. BEAUREGARD:]

GENERAL: The North Carolina commissioner, McRae, does not want anything but a columbiad gun, with its cariage, and two 32-pounders. This is contrary to my advice, which I have earnestly paressed. Mr. McRae, however, insist that only a columbiad can defend Fort Macon. If you approve, I am willing to let them have Lamar's gun without the pintle, which is essential here. I will supply its place by one of the iron battery guns. He will then have two 32-pounders and one 8 inch for Macon and two 8-inch sea-coast howitzers for Caswell, together with two 24-pounders from the enfilade and two 24-pounders from Sumter.

Very respectfully,

WM. H. C. WHITING,
Acting Inspector-General.



Page 14
Chapter LXIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.