War of the Rebellion: Serial 108 Page 1255 Chapter LXIII. MISCELLANEOUS REPORTS, ETC.

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engaged. Shortly after the engagement the Ninth New Jersey arrived and joined the First Brigade, to which it belonged. The Eighty-ninth New York did not arrive until the following day. I took into this action about 3,400 men, and my casualties were as follows:

Killed.......................... 98

Wounded......................... 634

Missing......................... 311

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Total...........................1,403

It was subsequently disclosed during the flag of truce for the burial of the dead that most of the missing were killed. In this battle my division inspector, Major J. H. Converse, was killed. One of my aides-de-camp, Lieutenant Clark Smith, was severely wounded by a musket-ball through the thigh. He is still absent by reason of his wound, and in a critical condition. My assistant adjutant-general, Captain Abel, was repeatedly grazed, and my remaining aide-de-camp, Lieutenant Baker, was slightly contused on the shoulder. His coat was perforated with five bullet holes. General Stannard, commanding First Brigade, received a slight wound in the thigh. The loss of line officers was exceedingly severe, a proof at once of the effectiveness of the regiments and of the unsurpassed bravery with which they were led. I cannot make especial mention of particular regimental officers to distinguish them above others. I refer to the accompanying reports of brigade commanders.* With scarcely an exception, the conduct of the whole command was most creditable. To General Stannard and Colonel Stedman, brigade commanders, signal commendation is due. From this date (June 3) until the evening of June 12 my division remained on the ground which they had won, and advanced their intrenchments in some places to within sixty yards of the enemy's works. The principal labor of superintending and constructing these intrenchments was devolved on Colonel Stedman, commanding Second Brigade. He demonstrated his practical knowledge as an engineer in the construction of these intrenchments. For his conduct during these operations, and which has been unfirmly excellent during all the time he has been under my command, I take this occasion to recommend him for promotion to the rank of brigadier-general. This is due to him for his services, and is especially desirable to establish him against all contingencies in the command was continually within easy range of the enemy's musketry fire, and were only protected from it by their intenchments. The aggregate of casualties during this period was:

Killed............................ 20

Wounded........................... 88

Missing........................... 2

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Total............................. 110

On the night of the 12th of June my division was withdrawn from Cold Harbor and marched to White House, under orders to embark immediately for Bermuda Hundred. Late in the afternoon of the 13th I obtained transports, and arrived at Bermuda Hunred on the following day, except the Second Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery, commanded by Colonel Gibson, and which had been added to my command just before leaving Cold Harbor. This regiment and the Ninth New Jersey were detained on the river, and did not join me until late in the day at

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*See Stannard and Stedman, post.

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