War of the Rebellion: Serial 108 Page 1244 MD., E. N. C., PA., VA., EXCEPT S. W., & W. VA. Chapter LXIII.

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that we were about to make an attack, the other brigade commanders having the same orders. The One hundredth New York was immediately advanced across the open space into the slashing within 200 yards of the enemy's fortifications, and were at once hotly engaged. The Twenty-fourth was advanced to the position vacated by the Ine hundredth, and the Tenth was similarly advanced. In case that a charge was ordered, the One hundredth was to go into the enemy's intrenchments, followed by the Twenty-fourth, and the tenth advance to the slashing as a support. Three assaults in force were made upon the lines of the second and Third Brigades, but were repulsed with great loss to the enemy. The brigade held this position, the front line fighting constantly, until 9.15 a. m., when I was ordered by General Terry to leave a strong line of skirmishers in my front, then fall back and form my regiments in the open field back of me, not letting the enemy see the movement. At this time six companies of the One hundredth were in the slashing as skirmishers, four companies at the edge of it as supports. Not being certain as to the meaning of the order, whether the field in the rear of my position or the field in rear of my camp was intended, I left the Twenty-fourth and moved with the Tenth through the woods into the field in rear of my camp, supposing the right was to be re-enforced, at the same time sending to the general for instructions. I soon received orders to move the Twenty-fourth by the right flank into the same field, keeping closed with the Second Brigade, whichw as executing the same movement. One of my staff was sent to conduct the Twenty-fourth. The Twenty-fourth had barely moved the length of its line when the enemy appeared in force, the skirmishers of the Second Brigade having suddenly retired. Pressed by a hot fire, Colonel Osborn was compelled to fall back in line, fighting through the camps and through a thick undergrowth, which, with a high fence which he was compelled to pass, greatly disordered his line. In this condition the enemy, following closely, poured a destructive fire into his ranks, killing two of his commissioned officers and a number of his enlisted men. Under this fire Colonel Osborn reformed his regiment, and facing, poured volley after volley upon the advancing enemy, driving him back in confusion. At the same time the Tenth formed nearly at right angles with the Twenty-fourth on another side of the field, opened a cross-fire upon the rebels, and in five minutes the whole square field and wood were cleared. It was here, in repulsing this onset of the enemy, that the loss of these two regiments mostly occurred.

Having conducted the Tenth to the rear along the left of the enemy's fortifications captured by us two days before, and notified my division commander, I rejoined the Twenty-fourth and One hundredth, which had fallen back beyond the railroad. The Eleventh had been sent down the turnpike to report to General Ames. By order of General Gillmore I conducted the Twenty-fourth and One hundredth across the railroad along the road to the rear of a new position taken up by the general to cover the retreat, and occupied strongly by his artillery. Here, joined by the Tenth, the brigade was moved into the open field and halted to allow General Turner's division to pass. Soon after I was ordered by General Butler to move forward on the double-quick and and form a junction, as I understood, with Smith's corps. About the same time I was ordered by General Terry to remain where I was until he could get his division together, and then to follow Turner's division. The brigade was moved to the pike, thence to the open field near Perdue's house, and forward in line of battle. After about two hours I was ordered by General Terry to remain where I was until he could het his division together, and then to follow Turner's division together, and then to follow Turner's division. The brigade was moved to the pike, thence to the open field near Perdue's house, and forward in line of battle. After about two hours I was ordered with two regiments (the Tenth and Twenty-fourth) to move