War of the Rebellion: Serial 108 Page 1000 MD., e. N. C., Pa., Va., except S. W.,& W. VA. Chapter LXIII.

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being forwarded, and that as commandant of the department he must decide on the proper employment of his force under the emergency.

This will place the responsibility where it properly belongs.

J. A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War.

[Third indorsement.]

B. N. H.:

Directions had been given before this with indorsement not returned.

J. D.

[Inclosure.]

PETERSBURG, June 9, 1864.

General G. T. BEAUREGARD:

The enemy have taken the works on the Jerusalem plank road and are advancing into town. Send men re-enforcements at once.

H. A. WISE,

Brigadier-General.

[Indorsement.]

General Beauregard replied he could send no re-enforcements.

[36.]

CHARLOTTESVILLE, June 9, 1864--11 a. m.

General R. E. LEE:

Have just arrived and have your dispatch of yesterday. Don't know force of enemy. Crook and Hunter have united forces, said to be strong, with great deal artillery. Would like to have Colonel King and his battalion. If you can't spare all, and will send him, with one good battery, I can put him in command of all my artillery.

JOHN C. BRECKINRIDGE,

Major-General.

[37.]

MECHUM'S RIVER, June 9, 1864--2.30 p. m.

General BRAGG:

I find some 300 home guards here under Colonel Taliaferro, who tells me that the local reserves are all ordered to Lynchburg and Richmond. I respectfully suggest that all reserve force of this region be ordered to report to me, and a good officer be sent to command them or that I be authorized to appoint one.

John C. BRECKINRIDGE.

[37.]

JUNE 9, 1864.

Major WILLIAM NORRIS:

There is no news of importance at this time other than what is contained in the inclosed dispatch. It is thought that Old Abe would call for at least 300,000 men and a loan of $500,000,000 between this and the 1st of July. Indeed, we are almost sure he will, judging from expressions of his Cabinet. We think it all important that a diversion should be made, either to capture or release our prisoners at Point Lookout or a raid upon Washington with a view to the destruction of the military supplies and public property, or both at the same time would certainly