War of the Rebellion: Serial 108 Page 0960 MD., e. N. C., Pa., Va., except S. W.,& W. VA. Chapter LXIII.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMIES CONFEDERATE STATES,

Richmond, May 26, 1864.

General SAMUEL COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General:

GENERAL: Please instruct General Holmes, of North Carolina; Kemper, of Virginia; Cobb, of Georgia, and Chesnut, of South Carolina to organize and call out the reserve forces of their respective States in such localities as will least affect the producing interests of the country. We require in Georgia two regiments at Savannah, three at prison depot, Andersonville, and at least five at Atlanta, and on all railroads leading to that point as bridge guards. In South Carolina, three at Charleston and at least that many in the northwest of the State. In North Carolina, five regiments from Wilmington to Weldon and two in the mountain district. In Virginia, ten to fifteen regiments for Richmond, two for Petersburg, and two for Danville railroad.

Very respectfully, general, your obedient servant,

BRAXTON BRAGG,

General.

[36.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA,

May 26, 1864--10.45 a. m.

Lieutenant-General EWELL:

GENERAL: General Lee directs me to say that General Kershaw has reported that the enemy was moving up the river all night, infantry, cavalry, and artillery, crossing from this to the other side. At the same time they were working in his (Kershaw's) front, apparently intrenching. It is very important to know what is on this side of the river. General Anderson has been instructed to advance his skirmishers cautiously, with a view of ascertaining what is in his front. You are desired to do the same.

Respectfully,

W. H. TAYLOR,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[36.]

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPT. OF NORTH CAROLINA,

AND SOUTHERN VIRGINIA, Numbers 7.

Hancock's House, May 26, 1864.

I. Officers and men, especially those occupying advanced positions for the purpose of watching and giving warning of the approach of the enemy, are enjoined to remember the great importance of communicating reliable information regarding the strength, movement, and positions of the enemy. In making reports of this character officers will discriminate between fact and rumor, and will discountenance, and as far as practicable prevent, the circulation of false rumors and exaggerated reports. Parties originating such rumors will be immediately arrested and held in custody till their cases can be investigated.

II. When an expedition is on foot in this department it is specially enjoined on all officers and soldiers who may have knowledge of the facts to abstain rigidly from conversing on the subject either among