War of the Rebellion: Serial 108 Page 0751 Chapter LXIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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GOLDSBOROUGH, N. C., August 4, 1863.

Honorable J. A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War:

Although General J. G. Martin, in command east of this, is a personal friend, whom I like very much, it is proper that I should inform you that he has not the confidence of the army of the people. I think he is not sufficiently active, and I learn from good authority that his troops are very much demoralized, and that both officers and men believe he will not fight, and for that reason wish a change of commander. I therefore think it my duty to request that he be transferred to some other point and and that some young, active North Carolina brigadier be put in command. The importance of defending the country on the Wilmington road from the raids of the cavalry of the enemy I nneed not impress on you. I do not see how our army in Virginia can be supported without the grain, bacon, &c., from this line of road. Is it possible to spare us a regiment of cavalry from Virginia? I know the importance of concentrating our forces against the large armies of the enemy. Nearly the entire arms-bearing men of this region went into the army at the commencement of the war, so that those who are left can accomplish but little.

Very respectfully,

WM. T. DORTCH,

C. S. Senator.

[29.]

WELDON, August 4, 1863.

General S. COOPER:

No information on the subject. It may be true as regards the infantry. It can hardly by true as to the cavalry. I will do all that I can to find out. The enemy have all left this immediate section and are beyond the Chowan and below Plymouth.

M. W. RANSOM,

Brigadier-General.

[29.]

WELDON, August 5, 1863.

(Received Richmond 6th, 1863.)

General S. COOPER:

Just received following from Franklin: Mrs. Savage, from Portsmouth, Va., reports large force of Yankees at Portsmouth and Norfolk, but that they are embarking as fast as they can to re-enforce their forces at Charleston. Muskets were stacked all over the streets, soldiers putting their baggage on board their vessels.

M. W. RANSOM,

Brigadier-General.

[29.]

AUGUST 6, 1863.

Captain MANNING:

General Lee has just sent this message to the signal corps on Mount Pony: "Can you see the enemy's camps on Rappahannock River? Is the atmosphere favorable?"

W[ILBOURN].

[29.]