War of the Rebellion: Serial 108 Page 0696 MD., E. N. C., PA., VA., EXCEPT S. W., & W. VA. Chapter LXIII.

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HEADQUARTERS,

Near Suffolk, April 26, 1863-7.30 a. m.

Birg. Genm. H. L. BENNING,

Commanding Brigade:

Your communication of the 25th instant is received. The commanding general would like you to assume the best position you can find to cover the object previously indicated in his letters. He expects that, with this view, you will thoroughly acquaint yourself with the country. We have nothing of interest here. Our position is unchanged.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. M. SORREL,

[18.] Assistant Adjutant-General.

RICHMOND, April 27, 1863.

Lieutenant General J. LONGSTREET,

Near Suffolk, Va.:

A special scout of this corps arrived last night from Washington and reporst the following: The effective strength of Hooker's army is confidently stated at from 150,000 to 160,000. Large re-enforcements have been sent him from Washington, Alexandria, and the Baltimore and Washington Railroad, and some from Harper's Ferry. Washington is alsmost stripped of its garrison. Mules with pack-saddles for ammunition have been sent to him. Hooker is going to cross the river at three points-two and one below. Re-enforcements for Suffolk, numbering from 10,000 to 12,000, were sent from Washington and not from Hooker's army.

WM. NORRIS,

[25.] Major and Chief Signal Officer.

HEADQUARTERS,

Near Suffolk, April 27, 1863-7.30 a. m.

Brigadier General H. L. BENNING,

Commanding Brigade:

Your two notes of yesterday have been received. The commanding general directs that you fortify a good position on the turnpike where it comes from the swamp and leave one of your regiments there to defend it, and with a portion of your remaining force, say two regiments, he desires you to make a strong reconnaissance on the trunpike, to ascertain the position and strength of the enemy and report with some degree of certainty whatever you may discover. He desires also that you will have desgroyed the wharves and landings at Edenton, or wherever else you may find that the enemy might effect a landing. Please cause their destruction to be thorough and complete. The stetement of Mr. Winslow has made no change in the intentions of the commanding general as to his dispositiom. He, together with others of like character, will be arrested and sent back.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servnat,

G. M. SORREL,

[18.] Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS,

Near Suffolk, April 28, 1863.

Major Cabell, Franklin, Va.:

The commanding general desires you to make efforts to obsturct the river near you by felling large trees in the stream from both banks.