War of the Rebellion: Serial 108 Page 0625 Chapter LXIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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[Sub-inclosure D.]

QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL OFFICE, VIRGINIA FORCES,

Lynchburg, Va., September 16, 1862.

Summary statement showing all property (and value of same) received by Quartermaster-General Virginia Forces from General C. Dimmock, for the use of State troops under Major-General Floyd.

* * *

Total amount expended, $1,090.02.

Summary statement showing all property (and valued of same) received by Quartermaster-General Virginia Forces from Captain Coghlan, for the use of State troops under Major-General Floyd.

* * *

Total amount expended, $ 23,168.10.

L. R. SMOOT,

Major and Quartermaster in Charge.

[18.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF WESTERN VIRGINIA,

Charleston, Va., September 22, 1862.

Honorable GEORGE W. RANDOLPH,

Secreatary of War, Richmond, Va.:

SIR: It is known to you officially and as a citizen of the State that nearly one-half of the white peopel of the State residing in this section are unrepresented in the State Legislature, and that the Fourteenth Congressional District is likewise unrepresented in Congress on account of the resignation of General Jenkins. It is represented to me that the Governor, influenced by technical considerations, abstains from bestowing the benefits of representation on these people by issuing his proclamation and refers the question to Congress and the Legislature to remove his scruples and direct his action, by the delay of which and the tedious proceedings of the law the people fear that the arrival of the autumnal freshets, bringing gun-boats and re-enforcements of the enemy into the country, may drive me away and these benefits be permanenetly lost to them. Many influential persons from this section solicit me to issue my proclamation offering the people protection while they conduct these elections at an early day, spontaneously and of their own accord, dislaiming, of course, all disposition or intention to dictate political action. I think it would signalize and complete the successful acquisition of the country by arms to restor it back to the State and the Confederacy by representation also. The facts that both the Legislature and Congress are now sitting, and that a near and vindictive enemy would use every effort to prevent an election, held with long notice and at a late day, recommend that this action shall be taken as soon as possible. I respectfully beg your action and reply on this subject at once.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. W. LORING,

Major-General, Commanding.

[19.]

40 R R-VOL LI, PT II