War of the Rebellion: Serial 108 Page 0541 Chapter LXIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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HEADQUARTERS,

Richmond, Va., April 17, 1862.

General S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General:

GENERAL: I have received the letter from Major-General Loring to Major-General Huger referred here by you, relating, first, to the removal of the heavy battery at Hamilton, N. C.; second, to the movements of the regiment of cavalry formerly commanded by Colonel Ransom. As regards the first point, I inclose a copy of a letter to major-General Huger, dated 21st of March, 1862, directing the removal of the guns from Fort Hamilton, and suggesting that the section of Captain Bruce's artillery which was at Hamilton be sent to Goldsborough, where it was needed. The rest of the battery was stationed in the Department of South Carolina and Georgia by paragraph XVIII, Special Orders, Numbers 55, 22nd of March, 1862, from your office. Ransom's cavalry was directed to proceed by slow marches to Weldon. It was intended that it should go to Goldsborough, but the horses were so much reduced that it was though advisable to halt it temporarily at Weldon, for the purpose of recruiting. I inclose a copy of a letter of 22nd of March, 1862, to Brigadier-General Anderson, then in command of the Department of North Carolina, informing him that the regiment was at Weldon, and directing him, after it should have recruited, to send it to such point as was in his judgment advisable.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE,

General.

[Inclosure Numbers 1.]

HEADQUARTERS,

Richmond, Va., March 21, 1862.

Major General B. HUGER,

Commanding Department, Norfolk, Va.:

GENERAL: I have had the honor to receive your letter of the 20th instant, reporting the execution of orders for the movement of troops in your department to Goldsborough. The battalions of Louisiana and Georgia Volunteers, which you forwarded to report to General Anderson, it is presumed were sent in lieu of the regiments of Colonels Clarke and Armistead. It was nto intended that more should be sent than were specified in telegrams of 19th. As regards the regiment of Colonel Leventhorpe stationed at Hamilton, about which you yesterday telegraphed, I do not see that much can be gained in keeping him at that place. Should the enemy attack him, so small a force could do but little to resist him and would afford no material impediment to his farther progress. It would seem much more desirable to concentrate the troops near the railroad, and keep them light and movable, so as to re-enforce readily any point of the road he might seriously threaten. The guns and all other ammunition at Hamilton should of course be removed, and could be devoted to the strengthening of other points of defense in your department. Unless wanted elsewhere in your department, it is suggested to send the section of Captain Bruce's artillery which was at Hamilton to Goldsborough, where it is likely to be much needed.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE,

General, Commanding.