War of the Rebellion: Serial 108 Page 0516 MD., E. N. C., PA., VA., EXCEPT S. W., & W. VA. Chapter LXIII.

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SPECIAL ORDERS,

ADJT. AND INSP. GENERAL'S OFFICE, Numbers 70.

Richmond, March 27, 1862.

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III. Brigadier General C. L. Stevenson is relieved from duty in the Department of Norfolk, and will proceed without delay to Knoxville, Tenn., and report for duty to Major General E. K. Smith, commanding.

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By command of the Secretary of War:

John WITHERS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[11.]

SPECIAL ORDERS,

ADJT. AND INSP. GENERAL'S OFFICE, Numbers 71.

Richmond, March 28, 1862.

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VII. Captain T. B. Manlove's company (B), Twenty-first Regiment Mississippi Volunteers, is transferred to Lieutenant-Colonel Taylor's Second Battalion Mississippi Volunteers, and will report for duty to Major-General Magruder, commanding Army of [the] Peninsula, at Yorktown, Va., as part of said battalion.

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IX. Captain Samuel T. Wright's company Virginia Volunteers will proceed without delay to Yorktown, Va., and report for duty to Major-General Magruder, commanding Army of the Peninsula.

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By command of the Secretary of War:

John WITHERS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[11.]

GOLDSBOROUGH, March 28, 1862.

General GEORGE W. RANDOLPH:

DEAR SIR: After expressing my great gratification and that of every one I have conversed with on the subject at your being called to the War Department I want to say a word about what is very dear to us all. The Virginia having first illustrated the power of iron boats, it seems the destruction of the cities on navigable waters is only a question of time, and a short time, unless we can fall on a plan to prevent it. I therefore suggest to you the expediency of closing up the channel of James River at some narrow point with stone. We have plenty above Richmond, which may be carried down in canal-boats. I know this will give us trouble hereafter, but if we prevent the destruction of the city the removal of the stone will be a small matter. The stone may be sunk in vessels or otherwise, as may be found best, and I would protect the stone blockade from being removed by a good battery on a high bluff. We are all quiet here. I don't think there is much prospect of Burnside advancing. I rather expect an attack on Wilmington. At New Berne, if we march down on either side of the Trent (his army being on both sides), he may cross over and fight or not, as he chooses, he having the means of crossing and we none. Thus he has the advantage of us. Still It hink it would be a good thing to destroy New Berne over their heads and take or destroy his stores. On this line we are in the hands of the railroads, especially if they strike at Suffolk, and the roads are horribly conducted. In reference to blocking the river with stone, I don't mean loose stone, for that would check the