War of the Rebellion: Serial 108 Page 0498 MD., E. N. C., PA., VA., EXCEPT S. W., & W. VA. Chapter LXIII.

Search Civil War Official Records

FREDERICKSBURG, March 10, 1862.

General FRENCH:

GENERAL: I write in haste to tell you all was accomplished fully to my satisfaction. At 4 o'clock all was fired - steam and other vessels; fires under all the carriages, shells, rooms, magazines; all were well burning and shells bursting when McLamore left. Captain Swann burnt quartermaster's, hospital, commissary; bridges were destroyed, &c. I think all was accomplished pretty much as you expected. All the men and officeres got off safely.

Very respectfully, yours, &c.,

FREDK. CHATARD.

[5.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE PENINSULA, Young's Mill, March 10, 1862.

General S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General:

SIR: There being no civil authority whatever in one-half of the counties in the Peninsula, and finding it impossible to punish offenses of the gravest nature not punishable by military law and to repress practices highly injurious to our public interests, the former being murders, thefts, &c., and the latter the clandestine sale of poisonous liqours to our soldiers and the merciless impositions on them by unpatriotic and unscrupulous men; and finding also that repeated orders and admonitions and the strictest preventive measures within ordinary military regulations will not prevent traitors in the lower counties from trading with and communicating everything to the enemy, I have the honor to request that His Excellency the President will issue a proclamation proclaiming martial law in the counties of Elizabeth City, York, Warwick, Gloucester, and Mathews; a large portion of the coast popuplation in the two latter counties, generally fishermen, oystermen, and Northern men, being unfriendly to our cause.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER,

Major-General, commanding.

[9.]

RICHMOND, March 10, 1862.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN:

MY DEAR SIR: I have just received the inclosed letter from my friend General Anderson. It seems to me that the best use I can make of it is to inclose it to you, and therefore I do so.

With great respect, &c., very truly, yours,

JAMES LYONS.

[Inclosure.]

WILMINGTON, March 8, 1862.

MY DEAR LYONS: Just leaving for the Upper Cape Fear on duty. I have but a moment, as the boat is waiting, and use that moment to say, do all you can to get force to Suffolk. From all I can learn, Norfolk will fall soon unless a largely increased force is speedily placed at Suffolk. After Norfolk they come on Richmond. So vital do I regard