War of the Rebellion: Serial 108 Page 0453 Chapter LXIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- CONFEDERATE.

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my regiment at such points where forage can be obtained, and as well as possible for the protection of the country.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. H. JENIFER,

Colonel Eighth Virginia Cavalry.

[5.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA, Goldsborough, January 24, 1862.

His Excellency H. T. CLARK,

Governor of North Carolina:

GOVERNOR: Your telegram of last night was so fully answered that I have nothing more to add that I have more than once asked for re-enforcements without eliciting a reply of any kind. Consequently, I infer that we are to be left to fight our own battles. Hence, we must raise as many troops as we can arm. I have 600 flint-and-steel muskets at New Berne, and expect 580 from Fayetteville to-day. All the troops in service have either percussion or flint-and-steel muskets, so those on hand are for new troops. No news from the coast. The storm has been so violent for more than forty-eight hours that it has prevented any of our scouts getting further information from Hatteras. Doubtless the enemy have suffered greatly, and are not likely to move for some time after its abatement. Colonel Singeltary, with the Albemarle, had not returned yesterday morning; probably detained by the storm. Will telegraph anything of importance.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. C. GATLIN,

Brigadier-General, commanding.

[9.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA, Goldsborough, January 24, 1862.

Brigadier General J. R. ANDERSON,

Commanding, &c., Wilmington:

GENERAL: Two letters from you dated the 22nd instant were not received until last night. As you desire, you are authorized to allow Lieutenant Gallaway's detachment to be increased to a company and employed in local defense, and to station the Brunswick company at Fort Johnston or elsewhere as you may elect. In regard to Colonel Leventhorpe's regiment it is now completely armed, but I regret to say is becoming more and more unhealthy daily. In the present state of our information as regards the expedition it would not do to send the regiment to Wilmington. I will, however, keep it in reserve until I know positively where the blow is to be struck. I am surprised that I have received no tender or reply to my frequent applications for re-enforcements. It is clear that it is intended that we should fight our own battles. I learn that a new regiment has been organized in Raleigh. It can at once be armed. I shall so advise the Governor. Nothing later from Hatteras. Colonel Singeltary went down in the Albemarle to obtain information, but has not returned, probably owing to the storm. Advices from Fort Macon represent the storm night before last as the greatest for many years. It has not ceased yet. May it