War of the Rebellion: Serial 108 Page 0416 MD., e. N. C., PA., VA., EXCEPT S. W., & W. VA. Chapter LXIII.

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RICHMOND, December 20, 1861.

Honorable J. P. BENJAMIN,

Secretary of War:

SIR: I am instructed by the convention of Virginia to communicate to you the following abstract of its proceedings and accompanying documents.

Respectfully,

John L. EUBANK,

Secretary of the Convention.

HALL OF THE VIRGINIA STATE CONVENTION.

An extract from the Journal, November 18, 1861:

"On motion of Mr. Tyler, the following resolution was adopted:

"Resolved, That a committee, tgo consist of nine memebers, be appointed to take into consideration the practicability of rescuing from the enemy the waters of this Commonwealth; to suggest and recommend any measures which may be esteemed necessary to accomplish so desirable an object; and the said committee be authorized to report by bill or otherwise.'

"The president then announced the following committee under the above resolution, viz: Messrs. Tyler Preston, Caperton, Barbour, Price, Seawell, Woods, Hall of Lancaster, and Fisher."

John L. EUBANK,

Secretary of the Convention.

HALL OF THE VIRGINIA STATE CONVENTION.

An extract from the Journal, November 27, 1861:

"Mr. Tyler, from the committee in relation to the occupancy of the waters of this Commonwealth by the forces of the United States, presented a report, which was adopted.

"On motion of Mr. Tyler, the secretary was instructed to communicate a copy of the report, together with accompanying documents, to the President of the Confederate States, to the Secretary of War of the Confederate States, and to Lieutenant M. F. Maury."

John L. EUBANK,

Secretary of the Convention.

[Inclosure Numbers 1.]

The committee which was directed under a resolution of the convention to take into consideration the precticability of rescuing from the enemy the waters of this Commonwealth, and to suggest and recommend any measure which may be esteemed necessary to accomplish so desirable an object, and to which was referred so much of the message of the Governor as related to the same subject, and the letter of Captain M. F. Maury which accompanied the said message, have had the same under consideration, and beg leave to submit the following report:

The committee lost no time in entering upon the investigation of the important subject committed to it, and summoned to its aid all t he naval offices known at the time to be in the city of Richmond. The committee was fortunately enabled to obtain the views and opinions of five gentlemen who hae seen much service, and who occupy a high place in the confidence of the community. The plan proposed by Captain Maury, which lookts to the construction of 100 steam-boats or launches, each to mount two heavy guns, to be of light and easy draft, was canvassed and scrutinized closely, Captain Maury himself being present to answer inquiries and to develop fully the size and structure of the boats, together with their cost, and the result was an entire concurrence in favor of their efficiency for the end designed, viz, of clearing the still waters, including the bays and rivers, of Virginia, to a great extent, if not entirely, of the enemy's ships. About $10,000 for each boat or launch, with engines and all complete, except the cannon, was held to