War of the Rebellion: Serial 108 Page 0355 Chapter LXIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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RICHMOND, October 23, 1861.

Colonel THOMAS J. JUDGE,

Huntsville, Ala.:

Proceed with as little delay as practicable with your regiment (the Fourteenth Alabama) to Manassas, where it will receive its armament.

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector-General.

[5.]

RICHMOND, October 24, 1861.

General A. R. LAWTON,

Savannah, Ga.:

Order immediately to Richmond all the unarmed troops that are in camps of instruction in Georgia and that have been mustered into service for the war. Urgent.

J. P. BENJAMIN,

Acting Secretary of War.

[5.]

EASTVILLE, October 24, 1861.

Honorable SECRETARY OF WAR OF THE CONFEDERATE STATES,

War Department, Richmond, Va.:

SIR: It is reported and believed here that we are soon to be invaded by the Federal forces. You will perceive to the map that our territory (the Eastern Shore of Virignia) is exceedingly exposed, and that we can have no opportunity of retreat in the evening of a defeat. Our defenses are entirely inadequate to repel even a comparatively small force. Our officers are entirely inexperienced, and I believe without the confidence of the people. Under the circumstances we would be very glad to be advised by you what course to pursue. It is thought the object of the Federals in occupying our peninsula is to re-establish the lights on our coast and to establish telegraphic communication with Philadelphia, and that a proposition will be made by them to be allowed to do this, and in the event of a refusal to enforce their plans. The feeling here seems to be a disposition to resist, but if they are in earnest in their intention they can easily bring forces against us that we can not by any possibility resist. Will you be so good as to advise what course ought to be pursued? Please excuse this liberty in a stranger in addressing you, and let me hear from you at your earliest convenience. I would be very much indebted to you, if you can conveniently do so, to refer this matter to President Davis. As it is out of the power of the Confederate Government to afford us any assistance in the way of force, your advice will be anxiously looked for.

Very respectfully,

John S. PARKER.

[4.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLIAN,

Goldsborough, October 24, 1861.

General J. G. MARTIN,

Adjutant-General of North Carolina, Raleigh:

GENERAL: I am informed by General Anderson that the muskets for the Twenty-eighth Regiment of North Carolina Volunteers have not been received, nor is he informed when they may be expected, and that 130 or 140 muskets are necessary to complete the arming of the Thirtieth