War of the Rebellion: Serial 108 Page 0276 MD., E. N. C., PA., VA., EXCEPT S. W., & W. VA.Chapter LXIII.

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point on the lower Potomac. If these suggestions are accepted I would then transfer my headquarters to Annandale; otherwise to Fairfax Court-House.

Yours, very truly,

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

[5.]

RICHMOND, September 7, 1861.

Major H. L. CLAY,

Lynchburg, Va.:

SIR: You will please furnish this Department with a list of the troops now rendezvoused at Lynchburg, nothing those that are armed and those unarmed, &c. By direction of the Secretary of War the Texas troops will rendezvous at Richmond, to which place they willbe forwarded as soon as they arrive.

I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. H. CHILTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[5.]

RICHMOND, September 7, 1861.

General B. HUGHER,

Commanding, Norfolk, Va.:

GENERAL: The Adjutant-General directs me to say that no telegraphic communication except that of 6th of September has been received, and also to state that your several communications in relation to North Carolina affairs have been submitted to the President, who entirely approves your measures.

I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. H. CLINTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[4.]

RICHMOND, September 7, 1861.

Honorable L. P. WALKER,

Secretary of War:

DEAR SIR: It is with unaffected reluctance that I again call your attention to the subject-matter of my last conversation with you. The deep anxiety which I feel for the protection of the sea-coast of North Carolina will with you be a good apology. Our sea-coast is nearly 400 miles in lenght, and hence would be incapable of a perfect state of defense. But while this is the fact, much of it is found consisting of sand-banks separated from the mainland by a continuation of sounds, which would impede the invasion of the soil by the enemy after having taken military possession of the outer banks. This is more particularly true of the northern part of our coast. In the southern part of the State the ocean washes the mainland. This is the case with that portion of the coast which lies between the eastern inlet of the Cape Fear River and the locality known as the head of the sound, a distance of about seven miles. The enemy, after succeeding in making a landing anywhere along here, could easily destroy the temporary fort erected near the inlet, and then would have free access to the town of Wilmington, which lies some nineteen miles above the inlet. The town at the present time, unprotected as it is, would be entirely at his mercy. I have been particular in calling your attention to this fact, as I am satisfied that we are only vulnerable by an approach after that manner.