War of the Rebellion: Serial 108 Page 0268 MD., E. N. C., PA., VA., EXCEPT S. W., & W. VA.Chapter LXIII.

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them aid in the consummation of their purpose. But as soon as, by act or otherwise, this sympathy shall manifest itself in helping the invaders of the State in their plan to subjugate and enslave it, then it f open treason, criminal in the highest and most oddious sense, and shall be punished by all the means I can command. To all those called Union men who have never given aid and comfort to the enemies of their State, but who have silently entertained their opinions, I appeal to remain quietly at their homes in the pursuit of their business, with the assurance that neither they nor their property shall be disturbed in any particular, but that they shall, to the extent of my power, be defended in the enjoyment of all the rights pertaining to the most loyal citizen of the State. On the other hand, to all such as have put up their opinions against the authority of the State, who have aided and abetted its murderous invaders in their attempt to subjugate it, by lending them their services in actual warfare upon it, and by piloting them in their march of invasion, to them I say that the sooner they leave the State forever the better for them, for if arrested in such acts of treason they shall be regarded as traitors and punished accordingly.

JOHN B. FLOYD,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Army of the Kanawha.

[5.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE KANAWHA,

Camp Gauley, September 3, 1861.

Major I. B. DUNN:

DEAR SIR: A very large force is certainly concentrating at Suttonsville and a portion of it advanced in this direction day before yesterday. All appearances are that the enemy intend to gather all their available forces immediately for an attack upon me here. This renders it necessary for me to concentrate with all possible dispatch the forces under my command to meet them. They can bring certainly between 7,000 or 8,000 men here in three days; to meet which force I can oppose only about 2,400 men, all told. You see from this the absolute importance of bringing to my side all the available force I can command. The three regiments on the road and the batteries ought to be brought up with all speed, but bread is esentially necessary for this, and we must have fifteen days' supplies of flour before we can do anything more than sit quietly here, living precariously from day to day. If I had the flour and the regiments up I would move into the valley of Kanawha to-morrow, and such a move would be productive of the greatest and most beneficial results to the whole country and would render Greenbrier as secure as Russell or Grayson. Appeal to the patriotism of the people to furnish transportation for fully pay-surely, we can get it-but if nothing else will do, the safety of our army will require us to press transportation. You know how disagreeable this would be to me, but necessity knows no law in this case. General Davis, I am sure, will and can be of the greatest service to you, and you can command his services to the fullest extent. Write to me fully about the condition of things and keep me fully advised by every opportunity. If necessary send me special couriers whom you can take from the cavalry.

I am, yours, truly,

JOHN B. FLOYD,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Army of the Kanawha.

[5.]