War of the Rebellion: Serial 108 Page 0236 Chapter LXIII. MD., E. N. C., PA., VA., EXCEPT S. W., & W. VA.

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Maryland Zouaves, are assigned to Colonel Richardson's regiment, the Forty-seventh, and the four companies of that regiment at Fort Larry will be detached and formed into a separeate battalion, to be commanded by Major W. N. Ward.

By order:

GEO. DEAS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[5.]

RICHMOND, August 16, 1861.

General J. E. JOHNSTON,

Commanding, Manassas, Va.:

SIR: Your communication of 11th instant is received, and in reply I have the honor to state that hereafter all troops ordered to your command will be armed before being sent forward to you.

I am, sir, very respectfully, &c.,

R. H. CHILTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[5.]

SPECIAL ORDERS,

ADJT. AND INSP. GENERAL'S OFFICE, Numbers 252.

Richmond, Va., August 16, 1861.

I. The Tom Watts Rebels, Captain Price's Alabama Volunteers, will proceed to Manassas as soon as transportation can be furnished, and join the Twelfth Alabama Regiment, Colonel R. T. Jones commanding.

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V. Captain Thomas Taylor's company, the Congaree Troop, of Hampton's Legion, South Carolina Volunteers, will march as soon as possible to Manassas and join their legion, serving with the Army of the Potomac. The quartermaster's department will furnish the necessary transportation for their baggage.

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VII. Captain Flournoy's company of cavalry, Virginia Volunteers, will march as soon as possible to Ashland and report to Colonel Field, commanding at that post.

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IX. Major John E. Johnson, Virginia cavalry, is assigned to the command of the cavalry companies serving with the army under Brigadier-General Holems, to whom he will report in person as soon as he is relieved in his present duties.

* * * * * * *

GEO. DEAS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[5.]

CAMP ON SEWELL MOUNTAIN, August 16, 1861.

His Excellency JEFFERSON DAVIS,

President of the Confederate States of America:

DEAR SIR: The retreat of General Wise from Kanawha has been every way productive of the worst results. It has dispirited our people and encouraged above all things the enemies of the Confederacy. The policy governing his action whilst there aggravates alike friend and foe. His retreat has been turned by General Cox to the greatest advantage. He is conciliating the whole population with great skill. But General Wise's retreat operates most injuriously on his own views