War of the Rebellion: Serial 108 Page 0230 Chapter LXIII. MD., E. N. C., PA., VA., EXCEPT S. W., & W. VA.

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SPECIAL ORDERS,

ADJT. AND INSP. GENERAL'S OFFICE, Numbers 249.

Richmond, Va., August 13, 1861.

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III. Captain J. T. Rosser's company will proceed, as soon as transportation can be provided, to the White Sulphur Springs and join the army under Brigadier General H. A. Wise.

IV. The Daniel Boone Rifles, under Captain Albert Covington, will proceed, as soon as transportation can be provided, to Manassas and join the Army of the Potomac.

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By order:

GEO. DEAS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[5.]

RICHMOND, August 13, 1861.

General J. E. JOHNSTON,

Commanding Manassas, Va.:

Your communication of the 7th instant in relation to field artillery has been submitted to the chief of ordnance, and returned to this office with the following indorsement: "Iron 12-pounder howitzers are being cast both hereand at Rome, Ga." There will I hear be no lack of field artillery. Harness is now being made at various points throughout the Confederaty.

I am, sir, very respectfully, &c.,

R. H. CHILTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[5.]

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Richmond, August 13, 1861.

General G. T. BEAUREGARD,

Manassas:

SIR: You are hereby informed that the President, by and with the advice of Congress, has appointed you a general (to take effect July 21, 1861) in the Army of the Confederate States. You are requested to signify your acceptance or non-acceptance of said apppointment; and should you accept, you will sign before a magistrate the oath of office herewith and forward the same with your letter of acceptance to this Department.

L. P. WALKER,

Secretary of War.

[5.]

UNION, MONROE COUNTY, VA.,

August 13, 1861.

Major General R. E. LEE,

Valley Mountain:

GENERAL: Your letter of the 8th has only now been received, and I have the honor in reply to say that General Floyd, having moved his brigade west of Lewisburg, and receiving from a reliable scout in the county of Fayette information that the enemy which lately occupied Fayeteville had fallen back and united with the enemy's forces on the north side of the Kanawha, at Gauley, I deemed the further service of the militia called out by me unnecessary at the present and directed