War of the Rebellion: Serial 108 Page 0218 Chapter LXIII. MD., E. N. C., PA., VA., EXCEPT S. W., & W. VA.

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shall be able to spare Captain Edmondston's company; but, in order to facilitate the captain's movement, I would suggest that conditional orders or instructions be sent me as to the point he is to go to and the person to whom he is to report in case he goes to Virginia. Colonel Iverson, Tenth Regiment, reports that four negroes escaped from Smithville and are believed to have gone to the blockading steamer. One or more of the number were good pilots. I have directed him to have all boats so arranged at night as to enable his guard to prevent them from beig used by unauthorized persons, but this may not effectually prevent a recurrence of these desertions. I believe that it would be found useful to fit out the Uncle Ben as a gun-boat and place her in the hands of the navy to be emplyed near the mouth of the river. The crew could keep a night watch upon the water, which may in time become an absolute necessity.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. C. GATLIN,

Brigadier-General.

[4.]

RICHMOND, August 8, 1861.

General G. T. BEAUREGARD:

York's and Watson's batteries were ordered as requested previous to receipt of your telegram.

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General.

[5.]

SPECIAL ORDERS,

ADJT. AND INSP. GENERAL'S OFFICE, Numbers 245.

Richmond, Va., August 8, 1861.

I. The Three companies of the Thirteenth North Carolina Regiment of Volunteers under command of Captain C. J. Cochran will proceed to the headquarters of the regiment with the Army of the Potomac.

* * * * * * *

By order:

GEO. DEAS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[5.]

FOUR MILES FROM CHERRY TREE ROAD,

August 8, 1861.

Colonel J. LUCIUS DAVIS,

First Cavalry:

SIR: I send you a message just from seven miles benond Summersville. The enemy are in Summersville 3,500 strong with six cannon. He will give you all the minute information necessary. start immediately for the purpose of intercepting any troops between Gauley River and Birch Mountains. The road I have passed over is worse than any I have ever seen. If you send troops this way, leave wagons behind and pack everything on horses. I shall be at the Leavin's Cabin road to-night. If you wish to send couriers to me, I will leave word along the road where I can be found. I will keep you advised of the enemy, and will, with God's help, send you a few of them. If possible, send me