War of the Rebellion: Serial 108 Page 0215 Chapter LXIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - CONFEDERATE.

Search Civil War Official Records

and take up the line of march in the direction of Lewisburg. The quartermaster will furnish the command with all the transportation at hand. The commissary will furnish the command with what rations he has. No unnecessary baggage will be allowed.

By order of Brigadier General John B. Floyd, C. S. Army:

WM. E. PETERS,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Floyd's Brigade.

[5.]

ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Richmond, Va., August 6, 1861.

General G. T. BEAUREGARD,

Manassas, Va.:

GENERAL: Mr. Snowden has reported here as agent of the railroad between this and Manassas, acting under your authority. I am instructed to inform you that a gentlemen, Major W. S. Ashe, every way qualified for the situation, distinguished at home, devoted to our cause, and having the confidence of the Administration, had previously been intrusted with these duties, and being president of the railroad, it is deemed best that this matter of transportation shoud be left in his hands, under the direction of the authority here.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector-General.

[5.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE KANAWHA,

Camp Gauley, August 6, 1861.

General A. A. CHAPMAN:

DEAR SIR: I must again express my hearty approbation of the judicious and decided course. It is all I could ask. You should look with great care as you advance upon the neighborgood of the enemy. They are cunning and stealthy. I will send you a company of artillery in a very short time. It is now at White Sulphur, and my orders go for them at once. I am quite sure your best course is to march down the country so as fall in below or about Charleston, as indicated in my last. Colonel Jenkins is fully possessed of my views on that point. I will advance the moment my regiments come up and hope to faff in below Cox on the river. I will keep up constant communication with you, for it is essential for us to act in close concert; indeed, it may become necessary for you to cross the river at some point and unite your force with mine.

With many wishes for your success, I am, very truly, yours,

JOHN B. FLOYD,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Army of the Kanawha.

[5.]

Resolutions of thanks to Generals Joseph E. Johnston and Gustave T. Beauregard and the officers and troops under their command at the Battle of Manassas.

Resolved by the Congress of Confederate States of America, That the thanks of Congress are eminently due, and are hereby cordially