War of the Rebellion: Serial 107 Page 1017 Chapter LXIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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approach of the enemy to Wheeling, it only affords another proof of the disastrous panic spread by the cowardly telegraph operators who deserted their posts at Grafton and Fairmont.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBT. C. SCHENCK,

Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. MIDDLE DEPARTMENT, EIGHTH ARMY CORPS,

Baltimore, April 29, 1863.

Brigadier-General KELLEY,

New Creek, Va.:

The most reliable information I have of the number of the rebels who have been at Fairmont makes the estimate from 600 to 1,000. Let Mulligan know.

WM. H. CHESEBROUGH,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General.

[25.]

HDQRS. MIDDLE DEPARTMENT, EIGHTH ARMY CORPS,

Baltimore, April 29, 1863.

Brigadier-General KELLEY,

New Creek, Va.:

Railroad people reported yesterday that our troops had evacuated Rowlesburg. I do not understand that the Cheat River trestles must still be protected. Have you sent force beyond Oakland? Mulligan reported to Wheeling yesterday the enemy in strong force at Morgantown. Where exactly is Greenland Gap? It is not on map; . When you can do it, get the names of all officers and men who fought so bravely at Greenland Gap, with special report. You may find major Showalter deserves particular mention also.

ROBT. C. SCHENCK,

Major-General, Commanding.

[25.]

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH CORPS,

Ely's Ford, April 30, 1863-5.20 a. m. (Received 7 a. m.)

Brigadier-General HUMPHREYS,

Commanding Third Division:

GENERAL: The major-general commanding directs me to inform you that we have crossed the Rapidan at Ely's Ford, with the exception of the batteries, which are preparing to cross now. The major-general commanding is of the opinion that, in consequence of the force we have across the river, there is no necessity for keeping the whole of your command with the train. He thinks one regiment ought to suffice. You are desired, therefore, to push forward with all speed possible with the rest of your command, in order to join the column. The major-general commanding directs me to say that now time is precious and the most must be made of every moment, and it is of the highest importance that the whole corps should be united as rapidly as possible.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

FRED. T. LOCKE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.