War of the Rebellion: Serial 107 Page 1011 Chapter LXIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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CAMP STEVENSON, HDQRS. 44TH Regiment MASS. VOL. MILITIA,

New Berne, April 25, 1863.

Colonel Henry T. SISSON,

Commanding Fifth Regiment Rhode Island Volunteers:

COLONEL: At a meeting of the field, staff, and line officers, held in Washington, N. C., on Tuesday evening, April 21, Colonel F. L. Lee presiding, the following resolutions were unanimously adopted:

Whereas, during the late siege of Washington, N. C., when the town had been bombarded and all its communications cut off for fifteen days, after several ineffectual attempts had been made to relieve the garrison and the enterprise had been virtually pronounced impracticable, Colonel Sisson volunteered the services of his regiment, and succeeded, against every obstacle and discouragement, in running the blockade with the steamer Escort, thus bringing to the besiege forces the mud-needed re-enforcements, ammunition, and supplies:

Resolved, That in this achievement Colonel Sisson, with his brave regiment, has performed one of the most heroic acts of the war, and that this act, by so dishearting the enemy that within ten days he was led to retire, was the immediate cause of the raising of the siege.

Resolved, That the members of the Forty-fourth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Militia feel that thanks are particularly due from them to their comrades in arms, who so generously volunteered their services and met so great risks in carrying succor to a brother regiment.

Resolved, That as an expression of their gratitude and admiration, if it meet the wishes of the Fifth Rhode Island Regiment, a set of colors be presented to them, bearing a device commemorative of their act of gallantry.

FRANCIS L. LEE,

Colonel, Commanding Forty-fourth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Militia.

[18.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF WASHINGTON,

April 26, 1863-2 p. m. (Received 2.25 p. m.)

Major-General SCHENCK,

Commanding, Baltimore:

I have the following: On the 21st Jones was at Harrisonburg and Imboden not far off; their whole force about 6,000. They had just issued ten days' rations and it was understood that they were intending to turn Milroy and destroy the railroad bridges on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad at the mouth of South Branch of Potomac and Cacapon River, which has heretofore been done by Imboden.

GEO. STONEMAN,

Major-General.

[25.]

HDQRS. MIDDLE DEPARTMENT, EIGHTH ARMY CORPS,

Baltimore, April 26, 1863.

Captain CARROLL H. POTTER,

Assistant Adjutant-General, War Department, Washington:

In the valley in General Milroy's command I have three brigades - General Ellitt's, Colonel Hay's, and Colonel McReynolds'. General Elliott has gone with his toward Moorefield; Colonel Hay remains still at Winchester, and Colonel McReynolds at Berryville. I have but three full regiments of cavalry. Two, the Twelfth and Thirteenth