War of the Rebellion: Serial 107 Page 0991 Chapter LXIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS FOURTH ARMY CORPS,

Yorktown, Va., March 8, 1863.

Lieutenant Colonel L. H. PELOUZE,

Asst. Adjt. General, Seventh Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia:

COLONEL: I have the honor to report, in addition to the testimony furnished by the deserter from the enemy yesterday, that a negro in the employ of Captain Coffin, post commissary, was in Gloucester County on the evening of the 6th instant. He reports that when about five miles out from the point he saw a large force, composed of cavalry and artillery. Of the latter there were five pieces, one large gun drawn by eight horses. Of the others, two at least were brass. When he saw them they were moving toward Gloucester Court-Hourse. He afterward was at the house where General Lee (he described him as an old looking man) dined or took tea, and from the servants he learned that Lee had told the mistress of the house that he had 5,000 men with him. The negro thought that there were not so many; that he had come down with the intention of making an attack at Gloucester Point, but had retreated because he could not discover where the pickets were, either from want of proper guides or some other reason; that he intended to return to the attack, and meantime had left two men to ride around and gain all possible information about our pickets, &c.; that he intended to place the large gun somewhere above the Gloucester Point and shell Yorktown. One reason assigned for this falling back was that some of his men had deserted, and he was afraid they would bring information of the movement to us. It will be seen that this testimony fully corroborates that furnished by the deserter, and seems to place beyond a doubt the fact that the enemy are planning an attack in considerable force upon our lines at Gloucester Point.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. D. KEYES,

Major-General, Commanding Fourth Army Corps.

P. S.-The above is the substance of an account given by an intelligent contraband. It corroborates the information brought by Smith, the deserter.

[18.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

March 9, 1863.

General D. BUTTERFIELD,

Chief of Staff:

SIR: The works for the defense of Aquia Creek Landing and Accokeek Creek railroad bridge having been finished to-day, I have no furnther need of detals from General Geary's division.

C. B. COMSTOCK,

Lieutenant of Engineers and Chief Engineer Army of the Potomac.

[25.]

GENERAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS FIRST DIVISION, Numbers 19.

March 9, 1863.

The undersigned having been relieved from temporary command of the First Army Corps, hereby reassumes command of the First Division.

JAS. S. WADSWORTH,

Brigadier-General of Volunteers, Commanding First Division.

[25.]