War of the Rebellion: Serial 107 Page 0977 Chapter LXIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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He desires to keep his brigade on Maryland Heights, but I still think that the Sixth New York as heavy artillerists would be most appropriately transferred to the Heights. I am a good deal hothered about putting the troops together satisfactorily in divisions and brigades, and I wish I had more of your help. General Buford has not yet been ordered here.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBT. C. SCHENCK,

Major-General, Commanding.

[21.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

January 22, 1863-3.30 p. m.

General A. E. BURNSIDE,

Aquia Creek:

The weather was so thick at Seddon's that I could not tell whether the camp-fires back of Hayfield have disappeared or not. The campfires near Mansfield and in the valley of the Massaponax seem unchanged. I thought I could see a camp opposite Seddon's, but was not certain. Our pickets report the other side still strongly picketed by infantry.

C. B. COMSTOCK,

Lieutenant of Engineers and Chief Engineer Army of the Potomac.

[21.]

HDQRS. ELEVENTH CORPS, ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

Stafford Court-House, Va., January 22, 1863.

Colonel DI CESNOLA,

Commanding Cavalry Brigade:

COLONEL: As your cavalry force is so small you will send at once, under a sufficient guard, the New York Flying Battery to report to Brigadier-General Schurz and remain under his command until further orders.

By order of Brigadier-General Stahel:

H. BALDWIN, Jr.,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

[21.]

HEADQUARTERS FOURTH ARMY CORPS,

Yorktown, Va., January 22, 1863.

Major-General DIX,

Commanding Department of Virginia:

SIR: I have the honor to report that in obedience to your orders the One hundred and fifteenth New York Volunteers embarked this day on board the steamship Matanzas, with instructions to call for orders at Fort Monroe. The withdrawal of the One hundred and fifteenth from my command reduces the forces here to a point much below the necessities of this front. The infantry remaining with me are new in service and poorly armed. I urgently request that additional regiments may be sent here with the least possible delay.

I remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. D. KEYES,

Major-General.

[18.]