War of the Rebellion: Serial 107 Page 0971 Chapter LXIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEFENSES OF WASHINGTON, Numbers 6.

January 8, 1863.

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4. Brigadier General R. O. Tyler, having reported for duty to these headquarters in accordance with instructions from the General-in-Chief, is hereby assigned to the brigade composed of First Connecticut Regiment of Heavy Artillery and Nineteenth Regiment Connecticut Volunteers; also the First Wisconsin Independent Company of Heavy Artillery.

By command of Major-General Heintzelman:

CARROLL H. POTTER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[21.]

HEADQUARTERS FOURTH CORPS,

Yorktown, January 8, 1863.

COMMANDING OFFICER OF GUN-BOAT COEUR DE LION:

SIR: It is this moment reported to me by telegraph from Williamsburg that heavy cannonading is heard in the direction of West Point. I wish you to go up there and give any assistance or bring back news to me with as little delay as possible.

I remain, respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. D. KEYES,

Major-General, Commanding Fourth Corps.

[21.]

DUMFRIES, January 9, 1863.

General STAHEL:

My scouting party of 150 cavalry returned from Brentsville. On their arrival there, found out that a party of the First Michigan Cavalry, consisting of the commissioned officer and seven men, had a skirmish in the place about 12 m. The commissioned officer was taken prisoner whilst reading a paper, being dismounted. Two men killed, 1 mortally wounded, 3 taken prisoner, 1 escaped. They were all dismounted save the one who escaped, and were surprised. Party went within two miles and a half of Catlett's Station; no force there; returned via Independent Hill. All quiet.

CHAS. CANDY,

Colonel.

[21.]

HEADQUARTERS FOURTH ARMY CORPS,

Yorktown, Va., January 12, 1863.

Major General JOHN A. DIX,

Commanding Department of Virginia:

SIR: It is probably known to you that from the Fifth Pennsylvania Regiment and the detachment of the Sixth New York Cavalry, under my command, I can only muster about 600 well-mounted troopers. With those I have repeatedly scoured the country up this peninsula, that between the Pamunkey and Mattapony Rivers, and the country on the left bank of the York River. Infantry has often been sent out with the cavalry, and all our scouts and raids have been successful. The rebels are at last aroused and are determined to catch us or to be avenged. When the party under Major Hall returned the 8th instant from the White House they had but just left West Point to come to Yorktown when a detachment of upward of 200 rebel cavalry arrived