War of the Rebellion: Serial 107 Page 0881 Chapter LXIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--UNION.

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in Chambersburg, Pa., have gone in the direction of Waynesborough. In that case it is probable that they may seek to cross the river through Boonsborough, as Waynesborough si but nine miles from there.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN R. KENLY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding at Williamsport.

[19.]

FREDERICK, October 11, 1862--7.30 p. m.

Captain CADWALADER:

CAPTAIN: You will proceed with your company (twenty-five men) toward Middleburg and scout the country on each side of that road, in the general vicinity of Middleburg]. Get any information you can of the rebels, their force and the direction in which they are moving. Communicate to General Pleasonton, at Mechanicstown, and to me at this place. The First Maine Cavalry will be scouting toward Westminster.

Very truly,

R. H. RUSH,

Colonel.

[19.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

October 11, 1862--1 p. m.

Captain W. P. SANDERS,

Commanding Sixth Cavalry:

SIR: The commanding general directs that you move with your regiment, immediately on receipt of this, to Mechanicstown, passing through the Shookstown Gap to the turnpike leading from Frederick to Mechanicstown, and along the latter. On your arrival you will report to Brigadier-General Pleasonton, waiting for him if he has not reached there, and following him if he has left there. If you reach Mechanicstown before General Pleasonton, you will at once send out scouts, citizens if you can get them, in the direction of Gettysburg, and collect all the information you can of the enemy.

Yours, respectfully,

R. B. MARCY,

Chief of Staff.

Colonel Rush will be directed to send a squadron to Middletown, and you will, therefore, take your wole command.

[19.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

October 12, 1862--6.20 p. m.

General G. STONEMAN, Poolesville, Md.:

By direction of the commanding general I telegraphed to you at 1 p. m. yesterday, informing you that a force of about 2,000 rebel cavalry had left Chambersburg at 9 o'clock yesterday morning, in the direction of Gettysburg, and that as they might be makign for some ford opposite Leesburg, you would keep yor cavalry scouts well out on the approaches from the direction of Frederick, so that you might receive notice in time to mass your troops at any point the rebels might attempt to cross. It does not appear either from your own dispatches, or

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