War of the Rebellion: Serial 107 Page 0873 Chapter LXIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--UNION.

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officers to execute in the exercise of a wise discretion. Yet it is far wiser to apply preventive measures, as far as their application will be serviceable, than to depend only upon the last but necessary resort above indicated. The careful and diligent application of every means that armies have found useful in promoting discipline is first pointed out as a necessary step toward the prevention of the evil under view. Here reliance must be placed upon the intelligence, industry, zeal, and perseverance of commanding officers. The general desires you to stimulate every commanding officer in your corps to the renewing of his efforts toward the promotion of the discipline of his command. Increase the number of daily drills, multiply the inspections, insist upon the scrupulous observance of the Regulations in all the minor details, and it is believed that before long habits of obedience and discipline will have interfered to have cured in a large measure the great mischief under contemplation. The general awaits the receipt of the returns and explanations from the division commanders required by you with much interest. He hopes particularly that the disproportion observable in the increase in Rickett's division will have been made the subject of special investigation. Upon the receipt of these, the general commanding will direct such further and immediate steps to be taken to bring delinquent officers and soldiers to public and merited disgrace as may seem to him best suited to the purpose in view.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. B. MARCY,

Chief of Staff.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

September 30, 1862--9 a. m.

General A. PLEASONTON,

Commanding Cavalry Division:

GENERAL: The commanding general wishes you to send a command over to Shepherdstown and make an effort to parole the remainder of the rebel soldiers there to-day. If you have a force sufficient, he would like to have you continue the reconnaissance of yesterday toward Martinsburg, and if the rebels have but one regiment of cavalry and two pieces of artillery remaining it would not require a very large force. This is, however, left to your own judgment. Should your force be insufficient to-day, you may be better prepared to-morrow.

R. B. MARCY,

Chief of Staff.

[19.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

October 1, 1862--9 a. m.

General GEORGE STONEMAN,

Poolesville, Md.:

General Sumner sends this morning to Leesburg a brigade of infantry, a battery of artillery, and cavalry for the purpose of attacking the rebel forces at that place. These troops leave Harper's Ferry this morning. If you can co-opearte in this movement with your own troops, or by giving the officer in command important information, the commanding general wishes you to do so.

R. B. MARCY,

Chief of Staff.

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