War of the Rebellion: Serial 107 Page 0750 MD., E. N. C., PA., VA., EXCEPT S. W., & W. VA.

Search Civil War Official Records

HDQRS, FIRTS AND SECOND DIVS., NINTH ARMY CORPS,

Kelly's Ford, August 20, 1862.

Major - General BUFORD,

Commanding Second Cavalry Brigade:

GENERAL: You must be the judge whether it is practicable to come here by the south side. I should like you to send some cavalry here this evening by the road on the north side. The enemy's cavalry [about a dozen] have been on the opposite side of the river and killed one of our pickets. As man just in from the Harris Light Cavalry reports that this regiment had been driven in by a very large force of cavalry this morning. I don't think they can be in very strong force in your front, if that is so. However, you will know more about that than myself, so use your own discretion.

J. L RENO,

Major - General.

[12.]

HDQRS. THIRD ARMY CORPS, ARMY OF VIRGINIA,

August 20, 1862.

Brigadier General J. B. RICKETTS,

Commanding Division:

It is the order of Major - General McDowell that you do not fail to acquaint him as soon as possible if anything should occur tonight which it is proper for him to know.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ED. SCHRIVER,

Colonel and Chief of Staff.

[12.]

HEADQUARTERS RAILROAD BRIGADE,

Harper's Ferry, Va., August 20, 1862.

Lieutenant Colonel W. D. WHIPPLE,

Assistant Adjutant - General, Baltimore, Md.:

COLONEL: I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of the major - general commanding's telegraph of yesterday from Harrisburg, at

Martinsburg, and your telegraph relating to the same subject, on my return last night to this place. I telegraphed to Colonel Voss to leave the companies of his regiment at Paw Paw and return with the balance of his regiment to Martinsburg. You can assure the general commanding that the railroad is in no more danger now than at any prior period. If it had not been strictly guarded it would have been destroyed. Guerrilla parties are all through the country headed by returned men from the rebel army. Their object seems [to be] to collect men, horses, arms, do what damage they can to the Union men and the Government, and rejoin their regiments. Their numbers are greatly overestimated, and no fear need be apprehended of the destruction of any of the bridges at present. It is very desirable that more cavalry should be at my disposal than I now have control of, but I shall embrace the application in a separate communication.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. S. MILES,

Colonel Second Infantry.

[12.]