War of the Rebellion: Serial 107 Page 0678 Chapter LXIII. MD., E. N. C., PA., VA., EXCEPT S. W., & W. VA.

Search Civil War Official Records

by dotted contour lines some of the valleys which exist in the plateau. Of these, the important one makes up beyond the whithe house and this side of anothrer white house, supposed to be Doctor Garnett's. I think its depression extends nearly or quite to the Nine-mine road between and old chimney (doubtless of the Old Tavern) and our position, and its farther slope seems to fade into the level plateau near the Old Tavern chimney or near Doctor Garnett's. Mr. Graves (Doctor Trent's overseer), whom I have found pretty reliable, tells me there is a small stream in this valley, making it impracticable for wagons at its lower part, but that it is crossed by a road leading form James Garnett's to Doctor Garnett's. The bottom of this valley could not be seen from my postion, so that it is uncertain whether there is an abrupt ravine there as in some other places in the clearing, or whether the bed is as smooth as the farther slope of the valley. So far as could be seen, and the point of observation was then or twenty feet above the plateau, there was nothing to interfere with the movement of artillery. The rifle-pits, of which I have spoken before, seem to me to be at least half a mile in advance of the road supposed to join the Old Tavern chimney with Doctor Garnett's house. There were forty or fifty men visible to-day at work on them. They seem close to the woods beyond, in which several quartermaster's wagons were to be seen. Four pieces of the iron battery were in battery near the Old Tavern chimney and behin the valley already referred to. Beyond and behind J. Garnett's the clearing could be seen to extend toward the Chickahominy, also beond and behind Doctor Garnett's

Very respectfully,

C. B. COMSTOCK,

Lieutenant of Engineers.

[11.]

HEADQUARTERS SECOND CORPS,

June 17, 1862.

General BARNARD:

Things on Garnett's plateau remain unchanged; that the enemy are throwing up an earth-work in the woods just beyond the Old Tavern chimney. It is possible, however, that this may be in a clearing beyond, and seen throught the trees, but I think not. Another road for artillery was begun to-day, leading to the plateau, making three hidden from the enemy, or five if the two which opened on neck of wheatfield near J. Garnett's be counted.

C. B. COMSTOCK,

Lieutenant of Engineers.

[11.]

HEADQUARTERS THIRD COURPS,

June 17, 1862.

General BARNARD:

Would it not the worth while to bring up 24-pounder howitzers, or even some 8-inch siege howitzers, to replace the field guns in the redoubts? The redoubts would then be rendered more efficient and the field batteries would regain their important property of mobily and could be placed anywhere behind infantry parapets or in the open field. A light rifled piece is better at long range outside a redoubt than inside, and at short range it would have little effect upon a storming party. I think there are no more light batteries in this corps than