War of the Rebellion: Serial 107 Page 0621 Chapter LXIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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and men were with the expeditions at Elizabeth, Columbia, Washington, and at all places where their services were required.

With great respect, I remain, your obedient servant,

JOSEPH FRICKER,

First Lieutenant, Eighth Regiment Pennsylvania Reserve VOL. Corps,

Commanding Signal Corps.

[9.]

SIGNAL HEADQUARTERS,

New Berne, N. C., May 17, 1862.

[Major A. J. MYER,

Signal Officer, Washington, D. C.:]

SIR: I have the honor to report the proceedings of the signal party under my command: At the reduction of Fort Macon we communicated from the following points: Lieutenants Marsh and Lyon on Bogue Island or Spit; Lieutenants Bradley and Palmer, at Carolina City; Lieutenant Lang, at Morehead City; Lieutenants Wait and Andrews, at Beaufort; Lieutenant Hopkins and board gun-boat; Lieutenant Barrett on point of land on Cove Island; and Lieutenants Smith, Pardee, and Schlachter on board Alice Price, General Burnside's steamer. I take great pleasure in saying that the officers and men acted very bravely, and worked very skillfully and gave great satisfaction to the general commanding the Third Brigade. After the reduction of the fort, General parke complimented the signal party for the very efficient services rendered. I wish to notice particularly Lieutenant Marsh, of the Fifty-first New York, for his bravery on Bogue Island, he having there captured a rebel signal flag, and at different times, while in the discharge of his duties, was fired at from the fort, but he never stopped until his message was completed. I would also mention the name of Lieutenant Wait, of the Eighth Connecticut, who sent and received a number of important messages during the reduction of the fort. He, by communication with the station on Bogue Island, informed them when they would also mention Lieutenants Lyon, Andrews, Barrett, and others, for attention to duties and skillfully sending and receiving messages at their stations. One message received by Lieutenant Andrews signed General Parke, addressed to General Burnside, that a flag of truce from the fort wished to know on what conditions they could surrender the fort, and a great many others of importance. I hope that the operations of officers and men under command have given such satisfaction as could be desired from them.

With great respect, I remain, your obedient servant,

JOSEPH FRICKER,

First Lieutenant, Eighth Regiment Pennsylvania Reserve VOL. Corps,

Commanding Signal Corps, Burnisde's Division.

[9.]

POTOMAC CREEK, May 18, 1862.

(Received 5 p. m.)

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

The bridge over Potomac Creek is so far done that a locomotive has passed over and can now be used for transportation of supplies.

IRVIN McDOWELL,

Major-General.

[12.]