War of the Rebellion: Serial 107 Page 0595 Chapter LXIII. CORRESPONDENCE, eTC.- UNION.

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The section of the battery behaved well. I have already praised the cavalry. You see how I am compelled to write; a sentence and an interruption. You will excuse the result. I am very glad the telegraph is coming; we shall need it. I have just heard that the train and one piece of artillery was in rear of the point where our cavalry came on the Forty-fifth. I would be glad to pursue them, but am bound to obey instructions in good faith. Rest easy on that point. The men are praying that they may be encouraged yet to come to us.

Respectfully,

R. B. HAYES,

Lieutenant Colonel Twenty-third Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry.

P. S.- Lieutenant-Colonel Paxton will act as provost-marshal. He is admirably fitted for it and is pleased to act.

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CAMP NO.5., Princeton, May 2, 1862-4.30 p. M.

Colonel E. P. SCAMMON:

SIR: Company B and A Company of cavalry scouted the road toward Wytheville several miles to-day. They report the enemy all gone to Rocky Gap. None, bushwhackers or others, anywhere in the direction near here. Numbers of militia who were in service here yesterday are reported escaped to their homes, and willing to take the oath of allegiance and surrender their arms. A cavalry company scouted the road toward Giles. They report the Forty-fifth retreated in great haste to Giles, saying they found Princenton just occupied by 2,000 cavalry and 8,000 infantry. Their panic on falling in with Colonel Paxton's cavalry was even more complete than was supposed. They left knapsacks, blankets, and baggage. They had marched over twenty miles yesterday to get there and were worn out. There was a mistake as to the enemy firing on our couriers. No bushwhackers have been seen between here and Flat Top since we passed. Three parties have passed the entire distance since baggage trains. Negro servants of officers straggling along alone, &c., and nobody disturbed by the enemy. The couriers rode past picket-post of one of my scouting parties, refusing to half, and were therefore fired upon. Captain Gillmore is here with his company. Lieutenant Cooper and property left at Shady Springs is here. Forage is turning up in small quantities in a place, but amounts to an important item in the aggregate. Fifteen head of cattle have been gathered up. There are sheep and hogs of some where. Only twelve upon reported excused from duty out of the 700. Twenty-third men who came up, Company C, I left behind to look after their wounded. They will come up to-morrow. Rupel G. French will perhaps be crippled for life, probably die. Can't he but put in the position of a soldier enlisted or something to get his family the pension land, &c.? What can be done? He was a scout in our uniform on duty at the time of receiving his wound. If the present indications can be relied on, this region will soon return to its allegiance. Of nothing new transpires, will not one dispatch each day be sufficient hereafter, with the understanding that on any important event occurring a messenger will be sent?

R. B. HAYES,

Lieutenant Colonel Twenty-third Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry.

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