War of the Rebellion: Serial 107 Page 0586 MD., E. N. C., PA., VA., EXCEPT S. W., & W. VA. Chapter LXIII.

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Virginia Cavalry. Some are from Mississippi and Alabama. I have ordered McCall and his Second Brigade over from Catlett's to Fredericksburg.

IRVIN McDOWELL,

Major-General.

[12.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, Camp Winfield Scott, April 29, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I have the honor to forward, for the information of the Secretary of War, the accompany official copies of a general orders made by Major-General Banks, commanding Department of Shenandoah, and a communication from Major-General Burnisde, commanding Department of North Carolina. These papers are just received by me. The officers and soldiers who have rendered the services which have elicited this mention are detached from their regiments on signal duty, and are held upon this duty exposed to all the dangers of military serving, with little chance of distinction, and (unless there shall be legislation for the corps) none of promotion.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ALBERT J. MYER,

Signal Officer and Major, U. S. Army.

[Inclosure No. 1.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA, Roanoke Island, March 5, 1862.

Major A. J. MYER,

Signal Officer, U. S. Army:

MAJOR: By direction of General Burnside, I have the honor to communicate you his acknowledgment of the very efficient service rendered by the signal corps under Lieutenant Fricker. Their rapid and accurate method of transmitting dispatches was found of great advantage, and available when no other means could have been used.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

LEWIS RICHMOND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[9.]

[Inclosure No. 2.] GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE SHENANDOAH, No. 20.

New Market, Va., April 21, 1862.

* * * * * *

The officers and men of the signal corps (Lieutenant W. W. Rowley, Company F, Twenty-eight New York Volunteers, commanding), by their diligence, bravery and success have given proof of the perfect adaptation of their system of signals to every condition and position of the army. Of the field of battle, in the thickets of the fight, they have transmitted orders with the utmost rapidity and unerring accuracy. In the pursuit of the enemy, foremost in the advance, they have kept our communication open on every side by a mobilized telegraph, which shifted its position and renewed capacity for the transmission of intelligence with the momentary change of events. It is but just to