War of the Rebellion: Serial 107 Page 0583 Chapter LXIII. CORRESPONDENCE, eTC.- UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS LEFT OF THE LINE, April 24, 1862.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL,

Headquarters Army of the Potomac:

The following telegram has just been received from General Smith. What does the general commanding wish done? Please telegraph me at Smith's headquarters.

General E. V. SUMNER,

Commanding:

The Sixth Maine went down the creek this morning on a scout and discovered, about 1,000 paces below the works in front of us, a set of works stronger than thse, though with no artillery mounted as yet. I ask instructions.

W. F. SMITH,

Brigadier-General.

E. V. SUMNER,

Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS LEFT OF THE LINE, April 24, 1862.

General SMITH:

Your telegram has been received. The general with General McClellan, will visit your division this morning instructions will then be given you.

J. H. TAYLOR,

Chief of Staff and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE RAPPAHANNOCK, Falmouth, April 24, 1862.

Brigadier General R. KING,

Commanding Division:

GENERAL: I have this morning received a communication from General McDowell, dated Aquia Creek, April 22, in which is the following: "I want King's Third Brigade between the Potomac and the Accokeek Creek on the railroad." That is all on the subject, and whether he wishes it, now that is encamped, I cannot say. It would be best, of course, to obey the order. The department headquarters move to Hedgeman's house, about two miles and a half from Aquia Creek on the line of the railroad, temporarily, and will leave as soon as possible. A brigade of General McCall's division has been ordered forward. I received your communication of yesterday, containing the communication from the mayor of Fredericksburg, but as General McDowell was expected here hourly I did not reply to it. I now return the letter of the mayor and General Augur's, to be disposed of as you think best. I would suggest in connection with the subject that you cause all the boats on the ferries to be seized, as they may be useful in preparing any means of crossing the river which may be determined on hereafter. A negro who was in Fredericksburg yesterday reports that the enemy are moving away from the town all materials and things which may be useful to our army.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ED. SCHRIVER,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Chief of Staff.

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