War of the Rebellion: Serial 107 Page 0579 Chapter LXIII. CORRESPONDENCE, eTC.- UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE RAPPAHANNOCK, Catlett's Station, Va., April 20, 1862.

Brigadier General R. KING,

Commanding Division:

GENERAL: Your are ordered to move the rest of your division and your headquarters to Fredericksburg at once. Inform me whether you can take six days' provisions for Cutler's brigade and move promptly, as on it depends whether department headquarters shall move with your before. Send an answer by bearer and the hour to-morrow you can start.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ED. SCHRIVER,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Chief of Staff.

[12.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE RAPPAHANNOCK, Catlett's Station, Va., April 21, 1862.

Brigadier General GEORGE A. McCALL,

Commanding Division:

GENERAL: Pursuant to orders from Major-General McDowell, received last night, the headquarters of the department will leave this place at 8 o'clock this a. M. for Fredericksburg. The remainder of King's division (Cutler's brigade and Gerrish' artillery) moves at the same time, accompanied by the company of Davies' cavalry serving with your division, to the commanding officer of which orders were sent direct last night, or rather this a. M. There are four companies of Bayard's cavalry which remain behind with your command, also the signal corps, orders about both which you will receive hereafter. I telegraphed to the Adjutant-General about the order to Colonel Campbell's cavalry to join the Army of the Potomac, but no order has yet been received in the case. Should it arrive, be governed by it in directing Colonel Campbell's movements. There are two men of Bayard's cavalry who were sent out as a guard to a house, some six or seven miles from this on the Warrenton road, occupied by two ladies named Drummond. They are to remain till 22nd instant.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ED. SCHRIVER,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Chief of Staff.

[12.]

NEW YORK, April 22, 1862.

General BARNARD,

Yorktown, va.:

GENERAL: By request of General McClellan I have made a number of rope mantles or embrasure blinds for your siege batteries. His desire was to have 100 of them made of rope. The material could not be found in the market. Twenty-five is all that could be manufactured to be finished by to-morrow night, the rope for part of which is being made at the ropewalks. That you should not be disappointed I have in progress seventy-five of one-half inch wrought iron secured, to three-inch oak plank. These are every way more reliable than rope, although they may have the disadvantage of splinters from cannon-balls. Yesterday fifteen of the rope mantles were forwarded by rail to Belger in Baltimore, to be sent you by first conveyance via Old Point. They were