War of the Rebellion: Serial 107 Page 0511 Chapter LXIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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deficient in profile; and in many other repsects the system requires auxiliary works to complete it, w hich it will probably be deemed advisable to undertake early in the spring.

For this reason I have asked the sum of $150,000, but it is not likely that the works now in hand, and for which payments must be made this month, will require more than the balance remainign avaialble. Hence the necessity of an immediate appropriation.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. G. BARNARD,

Brigadier-General, Chief Engineer Army of the Potomac.

[Indorsement.]

Respectfully referred to the Honorable Simon Cameron, Secretary of War, with the urgent request that the necessary steps may be taken to secure this appropriation.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

[5.]

SPECIAL ORDERS, HDQRS. ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, Numbers 187.

Washington, December 16, 1861.

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14. Brigadier General J. P. Hatch, volunteer service, will report to Brigadier General George Stoneman, chief of cavalry, for assignment to the command of a brigade of volunteer cavlary.

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By command of Major-General McClellan:

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[5.]

HEADQUARTERS DIVISION AT FREDERICK,

December 17, 1861.

Brigadier General R. B. MARCY,

Chief of Staff, &c.:

SIR: Inlcosed is a sketch* of Harper's Ferry and vicinity which illustrates more clearly than the ordinary maps the suggestions I wish to present to you concerning that point in connection with the reconstruction of the railway there. There are three positions, all outside the town, the possession of all of which is indispensable to its defense: First, Maryland Heights; second, Bolivar Heights; third, Loudoun Heights. When in Sandy Hook I constructed a military road across the face of the mountain (marked by a red line of the sketch) upon which artillery could be easily moved from the base of the mountain on one side to the foot on the other. On the face in front and on the line of the summit are fine plateaus for artillery. Two or three pieces of heavy artillery will command the town and sweep measurably all the roads leading to it, as the turnpike to Charlestown, the road leading to Leesburg, and the mountain road from Keys' Ferry to Loudoun Heights, and to Harper's Ferry across the Shenandoah. A sufficient number of men to man the guns would be all the force required on these heights.

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